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120 lb Peter Wright anvil, can it be saved, and what is it worth?

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A local antique and collectibles shop has this Peter Wright anvil in the shop.  It has been there for at least a year because it was there last November when I saw it the first time and it's still there today and I snapped a few quick photo's.  Assuming I am reading the side correctly this is a 120 lb Peter Wright.

Unfortunately is had some damage and even more unfortunately the damage seems to have been repaired very poorly.  Other than the damage to the one edge the rest is not in terrible shape.

First question is can it be repaired into a usable shape?

Second what would you pay for such a specimen assuming it could be made usable.  $850 seems rather high for it given its condition but since it has been there for at least a year I think I might be able to talk them down.  What's it worth?

What do you guys think?  I am not without an anvil I have a ~80 lb anvil that was likely made in Pittsburgh PA in the mid 1800's.  My current anvil for its age it in good usable shape.  But having a second bigger anvil is always appealing.IMG_20191019_142054.thumb.jpg.3ee037840ba5419404e6f9cc1d5c43ac.jpgIMG_20191019_142121.thumb.jpg.df282c80014bf4c1d8dacaa4a73fe64d.jpgIMG_20191019_142131_1.thumb.jpg.761ccdbf383bba8174b6fd91307b90cd.jpg

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The price is nuts. You can get a new anvil, of that size for that same money.

The shoddy, incompetent 'repair' is incompetent and has damage the anvil still further.

The vendor is looking for a "forged in Fire' uninformed neophyte. Hopefully, that anvil will decorate the antique seller's shop for many years to come.

Some others will post about anvil repair.

It's a major job and costs much time and money.

SLAG.

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Still lots of face left on that anvil to work on, as long as whats left of the face is still hard and attached. That said, the price is silly.

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Yeah I think it could be refurbished but what would that cost?  Is that something I could educate myself on and do it myself?  I have a welder and access to milling machines to resurface the top.  Assuming they are willing to reduce the prices what is a fair price for this anvil in this condition?

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Look at NEW anvils and then spread the difference over a live time of use.  For instance, 25 years (of use) x 12 is 300 months. A $300 difference is only $1.00 per month, or a quarter a week.  If you use the anvil longer than 25 years, the price per month is even less.

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For every minute you mill on that anvil's face please burn a US$100 bill---because removing face thickness is throwing away years of use life!  The hardened face is not very thick---you can see that by the way the edges show it. 

That anvil could be used for decades as it stands. 

But I wouldn't pay more than US$2 a pound because of the damage and damaging repair---there is a proper way to weld on an anvil's face; but if it wasn't used then welding damages the face that's in contact, HAZ. That welding looks poorly done---would you bet that the person who did such a bad job did their homework and went to the time and extra expense to do it right?

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I would assume you would weld proud of the existing surfaces and would only machine this new weld material and as little of the original face as possible while creating a smooth complete face.

 

ETA:  I am not going to make a special trip down there but the next time I am in there I will offer them $200 for it.  Something tells me they won't bite but it might be worth it for a new project.

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A brand new Holland 140 lb anvil list is $950. 
Nimba Titan lists for $975. 
Rigid Model 9. Sale price $950. 
 

Any of the three are better than a heavily abused Peter Wright. 

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All three are probably better anvils than the PW when it was new.  I'll take cast steel over a thin hardened plate.  Having said that I like my PW (which is about the same size) quite a bit.

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Actually until I looked at Holland's website I never realized the swag blocks were so reasonable.  I would be far better off with a new 66 lb swag block than that beat up PW to go with  my little 80 lb'er anvil.

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I really like my SCABA swage block. It is small enough to carry into the garage when it is raining and I want to work on copper pieces. I just wish it didn’t have a shovel pattern on one side. I would much rather it had more spoon or ladle patterns. 

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For spoon and ladle patterns, cut or form a divot in the end grain of a stump.  Until you need the Holland swage block.

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How do you keep the log from burning?  The divots just get larger and larger. 

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As a smith you should be able to make your own steel tooling. Take a chunk of mild and indent it---top tool and striker with a sledge helps---then clean it up with a small grinding wheel on an angle grinder.  Repeat till you get one you like and then drill a couple of holes to mount it on a stump. (If it's protruding on the bottom; heating it up and letting it burn a hole to sit in on the stump is left as a task for the student.)

For cold dishing you can use a tin tray. (Food safe version of the old lead block.)

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