Ohio

330-lb. cast steel double-horn anvil with upsetting block

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Anyone have any thoughts about the maker of this anvil? I know I don't have enough to be sure (and there's no way to get more info as of now), so I'll accept wild guesses and pure speculation if that's all ya got.

This is CL local, seller says it's German (though he may mean German-style?) made in the 1940s, and cast steel with 2" face. He doesn't know the brand.

I can add images of the face that he's put up, but there aren't any pictures of the bottom that I can get to easily.

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The face looks---fantastic, she says as a newbie amateur whose knowledge of anvils are primarily from Road Runner cartoons.

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I keep returning to the post on CL, though I think this is about 200# more than I was thinking of getting in an anvil. But I kinda like it. If it was mine, I think I'd name it Conan (as in barbarian not as in late-night-show host). Or maybe Sechs Bieren (Six Beers), which is how many I would have to drink while I sit down to recover from moving the thing.

Any insight appreciated.

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Well the face is not 2"; that's just a casting thing they did.

What you really need to know is the results of the ring and rebound tests. May have to unclamp it to get a good ring result though. If it passes those tests it's a good anvil no matter who made it or when. If it fails those tests then it's not a good anvil no matter who made it or when it was made.  (Anvils can go through structure fires and lose their heat treat which can be expensive and tricky to have re-done.)  That is; if you are buying it to use!

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Thomas Powers,  the owner gave me the 2" face thing. So I see---that's something built into the mold, not added later. Got it.

I've looked at some images on the intertubes to get a sense of the maker. I doubt I'd buy this anvil as it's really big (for me) and he wants serious dough. I'm just curious as to who made it, etc.

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BigGun---he's asking US$2,300.

Dang it, you guys. I KNEW I shouldn't've brought it up here because my birthday was last weekend and now I want it. And I named it and that's always a mistake. Swaptober is in Longview at the end of the month and we're debating going (and by "we" I mean me and my fiscally responsible self)---my fantabulous spouse has already said she's looking forward to going, which is a lie, but she really is that nice and I really am that spoiled. I thought maybe something would follow me home from Longview that I got a screaming deal on and instead, I keep going back to look at this one.

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Good Morning,

$2300.00 is what a NEW anvil will cost. Known quality, known quantity. May even leave you change!!

Enjoy the journey to Longview. It isn't that long of a drive for you.

Neil

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Anvils are expensive in the NW, but for that? I would strongly consider a new anvil first.  But while we're yaking, I'm on Whidbey Island, and was thinking of starting a " generally North of Seattle" blacksmithing group.  Would you be interested if I get any further?  Or if there's one I don't know about, I'd love to join.  I'm thinking everywhere from Everett to Lynden.  I know there's a couple of other smiths on the island, and there' got to be a mess of wannabes in Bellingham.

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That is expensive. The form; the shape and the quality reminds me of this anvil below. 

It looks like a faceplate, but in reality it's a cast steel anvil, hardened face. Made in germany, but by a lower-end manufacturer, as mine had a fairly soft face.  Workable, but every ding I made annoyed me so much I stopped using it, especially given that i have another 3 anvils that are Extremely hard. I ended up selling that one.

 I wouldn't pay that much money for it; "Used ain't new".

 

 

VMAnvil.jpg

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that is a nice looking anvil

i would Spend $1800 or less for a new #275 Rigid or $1100 for a new #166  

my #166 kanca has proven more than big enough and I can move it around. Plus the warranty

good luck
 

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You could get a new made in USA NIMBA for that, and get a lifetime warranty. $2,300 is way too much in my opinion.

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BartW, that is a very good likeness. Thank you.

I think I have a little anvil fever. I like the shape of this one---a brutal beauty. And if I were to make an offer, I'd check it with a ball bearing test and I wouldn't offer the asking price as I don't want it that much and I'm not quite sure how the seller has valued it. There's another 300# south of me that was priced at US$3,000 and is now down to $1,000 and still dropping. There's a Fisher +300# that is priced at US$1,700 I know is going to Longview that looks nice as well.

Rojo Pedro, you make a good point about the weight. I've looked at the Kancas, but honest, BIGGUNDOCTOR got it right---I planned on buying a Nimba Titan because they are a weight I can deal with and the company is over on the peninsula in Port Townsend---I was on the peninsula yesterday. Oooo, I wonder if they'd give me a tour.

Nobody Special, I may be interested in a northern-ish Sound group. I'm pretty spoiled---my neighbor is a blacksmith and I'm like the son he never had. PM me and maybe we can email discuss or start another thread here?

Luckily, my anvil fever is a mild case, and I haven't checked the couch cushions for spare change or arranged to sell a kidney on eBay to get the cash for a purchase. I think I caught anvil fever because buying an anvil means I've completed the Wonderhut and I'm done with my shop build. Which I'm not.

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You know; if someone were to offer me this, I would first check it. Because it's relatively soft; it's easy for owners to "regrind" the surface. I've seen the lower hardness lower layers of steel peeking through; like strange blurry spots in the polished steel. Using a ball bearing or a really small peen hammer will tell you. Also; don't do the ball bearing or the peen test if it's bolted down. Put the anvil on a rag or something, and check if the "ring" is continous left to right. If is suddenly changes, this may indicate a crack in the anvil.

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