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I was given a pretty heavy and long pair of those tinsmith shears that have the ends that will fit in your anvil hardy hole.  I know they are used for sheet metal, but would using them to hot cut thinner metals remove the temper of the shear blades and ruin them for their original purpose.  Has anyone here used them for hot cutting?  I can see them being useful for cutting thinner stock for ornamental work instead of using a chisel.  Just thought I'd ask since most people mistake them for a blacksmith tool.  

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Could it be done? Maybe. Would it be worth it? Probably not.  A set of bar shears would be much better, as would a cutoff saw or a horizontal bandsaw. 

 Or, of course, a hot cut. 

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You sure they're they tin snips MC? Have a pic?

Frosty The Lucky.

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@Frosty I'll take a picture tonight, but these things are dang heavy and over 3 feet long.  Pretty heavy duty.  No doubt I could probably cut cold stock up to something like 1/16 of an inch.   I guessed they were tin cutting shears based on what I found on the internet, but I think they could cut steel as well.  

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Like this pair?

1A84FF4A-DE71-497C-8BDD-F1A0352DADFA.jpeg

I use mine for sheet up to about 16 gauge. While I'd prefer a Beverly shear, these are plenty good for their designed purpose. I'd keep them as-is.

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12 hours ago, MC Hammer said:

Has anyone here used them for hot cutting?

I expect the shear edge on these snips is high carbon steel that has been heat treated.  If used for hot shearing you would most likely ruin the heat treatment, softening the edge and making them less useful for their intended purpose.

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Ahhh there are blacksmith tools that are used on cold metal and are made for use on cold metal.

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JHCC, yes those are the exact shears that were given to me.  Look to be the same size too.  Heavy as heck.  Nice to know I can cut up to 16 Ga sheet metal with them.  I won't use them to hot cut anything.  I feared exactly what Latticino said above and figured I'd ask around and see if anyone used them for hot cutting. Sometimes you can get away with things and usually others will know.  I still like them and the price was right :D 

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A hot shear cam be built from an old grader blade. Cut a hunk that fits on your anvil, weld it to a hardy shank, cut a matching hunk and punch both peases for a pivot and instal a handle on the upper. So you can give it a good smak with your hammer. 

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I remember that shear  was in one of the blacksmithing books I have. (Country Blacksmithing?  I'll have to check this weekend.)

John; I feel a much greater affinity for you after seeing that picture of your shop.  To misquote Vespasian: "Scrap doesn't stink!"

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Blacksmithing for the homestead has a homemade shear in it.

Pnut

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Pnut: pictures?

ThomasPowers: It was so much cleaner back then.

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Am I allowed to post a picture from a book?

Pnut

Answer: not if I don't own the copyright.

I'll post the full title and author when I get off work.

Edited by pnut
reread the TOS

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Definitely don't abuse a set of bench shears by doing hot cuts with them.  A nice large set like that is worth more than most post vises so you'd never want to abuse them.  Build a hot cut specific version as C.R. Stevens mentioned if you really need the tool.

Typically those were not designed for a hardy hole but for a stake plate in a sheet metal shop.  Was just reading a copy of an early PEXTO catalog this morning and they also sold a special holder--basically a large iron ball with square holes in a special bench clamp so that you could have the bench shears held at any angle that suited you.

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Blacksmithing Basics for the Homestead by Joe Delaronde.  The picture of the home made hot cut shear is on page 28. I took a picture of it but since I don't own the copyright it violates the TOS.

Pnut

Edited by pnut

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I think I saw it in another book that predated JD's by several decades.  Good ideas often cycle---we see it happen here often enough!  As I've said: "Don't worry about being first, worry about being *BEST*!"

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