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ThomasPowers

Historic Post Vise Images

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While reading in an article on interchangeable parts; (https://www.bbc.com/news/business-49499444), I noticed a post vise in one of the pictures. 

I was interested to see the mounting bracket as I had considered the one shown in Moxon's "Mechanick Exercises", (https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015028306002&view=1up&seq=16), to be rather lacking.  I did note that both of these examples do not appear to be using a tanged mount---the type I'm familiar with from the early 19th century.

Anyone else have some historic examples?

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T.P.,

Thank you for the Honore Blanc-Wilkinson article.

It fleshed out my knowledge of their development.

Dan.

That article fails to mention Mr.Eli Whitney's (the cotton Gin fellow), contract with the U.S. government to manufacture several standardized thousand muskets. (circa 1804). He used interchangeable parts, but also set up an assembly line method to manufacture the weapons. He fashioned all the machines that made the parts.

His factory is now a museum replete with his manufacturing machinery, in Massachusetts.

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Have you read: "Nuts and Bolts of the Past: A History of American Technology : 1776-1860"?  It goes into more detail on the interchangeability issues as I recall.

There was also a fascinating article on the net about the history of accuracy and precision in machining, including Maudsley's screw cutting lathe for instance; but TBI strikes again...

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T.P.,

No,  sorry I have not run across that reference. (book?). It sounds interesting.

SLAG.

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It's main contention is that the pool  of trained workers that shifted from company to company as the companies started and crashed back then, (much like entrepreneurs today!), acted to "cross pollinate" ideas and methods between them resulting in the great blossoming of "American ingenuity" in the 19th century.  (Now that I think about it the parallel to the modern tech companies is pretty amazing.)

What I would call an easy read if you have an interest in the subject.

"A History of Western Technology", MIT Press, is a bit more stringent (drier),  in my opinion; but relying on original sources has some great information in it. (I loved the part about the  renaissance German "red metal turner" who kept inventing better metal lathes and getting squashed by his Guild who didn't approve of the innovations...)

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