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BoOnTheGo

Changing to a JABOD (pic heavy)

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Let me start by saying that I have really enjoyed this site. Whenever I have a question,  can always find it here. 

So, on with the storyFor the last 6ish years I have been using a washtub bottom blast forge, with a hand crank cheesy blower. I can say it has worked well for me (I only know what I know), I have been able to do for the most part what I wanted. Up to this point I was using mainly wood, pine specifically. Reason, easy to get and plentiful. 

I started making charcoal and found that this set up, for me, doesn't work as well as I would like. So, off to the site i go. Found out about the JOBOD and spent several weeks reading everything I could from everyone's experiences. No need to recreate the wheel. And this is what I came up with. I know how pictures have helped me, so I am attaching what I have done. I needed to modify a bit as I went. I have not used it as of yet. I have a few project that needed to get done before I relocate it. I know there will be a learning curve, and couldn't afford the extra time. I hope this is as helpful to someone else as this place has been for me

I will circle back after the maiden firing and update. The box is 30x30. Total cost for me was about $40. I only had to get firebrick and the pipe. The rest was scrap I had laying around the house.

(not sure if I am doing the picture thing correctly)

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I have one question. Is the tuyere sitting on the bottom of the firepot?  If it is you might want to move it up about an inch above the bottom so ash or clinker if you use coal has somewhere to collect. It'll also raise the hot spot a little.

Pnut

Edited by pnut

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No worries. I couldn't tell. In the pic It looks like It's sitting on the bottom brick.  It looks good to go. I love my jabod. It does everything I want it to do. It has some size limitations but I don't do anything large anyway. Keep us posted.

Pnut

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Thanks Laynne. This place is a wealth of information if one takes the time to look. I don't mind experimenting, and I would rather that be on working metal instead of trying to get it hot :D

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BoOnTheGo, that looks like a really good JBOD.  I recently found I wasn't allergic to coal smoke like I thought I was.  At some point in my blacksmithing journey I want to build a coal forge and you've really done your homework and have built a really nice one.  Anxious to hear how it works for you. 

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Let us know how it works out. Also, what are the depths you have on the setup? Surface to turye(sp?), surface to bottom brick? I’m considering reworking my own JABOD. It’s just not as easy to work with as the one at the “shop” I frequent.

Enjoy,

David

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11 hours ago, Chris The Curious said:

I recently found I wasn't allergic to coal smoke like I thought I was.  At some point in my blacksmithing journey I want to build a coal forge and you've really done your homework and have built a really nice one. 

Chris, thanks for the feedback. I am planning on using charcoal with this one. I am hopeful that within the next few weeks to be able to switch it out and get it going. I have found that this place has an enormous amount of information if taken the time to look. 

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10 hours ago, Goods said:

what are the depths you have on the setup? Surface to turye(sp?), surface to bottom brick?

David,  I pretty much followed what Mr Stevens laid out. There is about 1/2" under the bottom brick (I was thinking of a tad bit more insulation) and used firebricks as the layout. The wood is 4x8 so that is about  7 1/4" in total height. I have about an inch from the bottom brick to the pipe.  There is about 5" in depth from bottom brick to top. I wanted it to be flush, so I cut the brick down along the back. I ended up cutting 2 bricks in half for the back and then laid 2 bricks along the top of them. I figured I could always add some bricks along the top to add depth as needed. I angled the bricks along the side and cut one in half to top it off. I hope this answers your questions.

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Mine has about an inch below  the center of the tuyere and about 3 1/2in above the top of the tue pipe. I have a red brick on either side of the trench to contain the fuel also. It'll get to welding heat. After I started breaking the charcoal into pieces about an inch to an inch and a half it made a big difference.

Pnut

Edited by pnut

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That's is where I am trying to get to. Not all the time of course, to have the ability when I want, would be a perk. I think for me also was my current set up only allows me to heat the ends, so I am challenged on certain projects that I wand to do.
I really appreciate all your feed back, as well as others on this subject. I think it has really decreased the learning curve. As you can tell, I don't post a lot. Been a member of this site for 6+ years. It has always been a place for me to get solid information. I'm not a person to just say 'ditto'. For this project however, I though it was important to share what I had gathered so maybe it would be helpful to someone else. 

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Heating ends is the start. To heat longer sections, move enough material through the fire to keep what is hot still hot while adding heat to the outside length of the previously heated section. This should allow you to heat a 12 inch length or more.

If you need a longer hot section, modify the incoming air, that is put a T in the air line and make two twyeres to the same fire. Make them a short distance apart so there is no cold spot between them. Think of it as a double burner on your forge.

The idea is to modify what you have and solve the problem. No one ever said you could only have one forge, so build a second forge and test out what you think will work. You can use the original forge in the mean time.

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Sorry Glenn, I was referring to my current set up which is a washtub type forge (first picture). That is the one that I am limited to heating the ends on. This was a big factor to looking into the JABOD set up. It seems to be much more flexible in configurations. I do plan on keeping the washtub forge. I am going to relocate it to another area with it's own anvil. Plus, I admit that I am kinda attached to it.......

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You could add some bricks to form long walls above the twyere on the wash tub. Then put a piece of angle iron, V up, above the twyere to split or deflect the air into the fire. This should result in two fires contained in the walls.  You will have to play with the angle on the iron so the two fires meet each other and do not leave a cold spot. You may need to run the fire deeper. 

Fuel does not make the fire hot, air makes the fire hot.  From the wash tub photo, you may need to have the fire at twice that depth and cut back on the air. 

Charleston, SC 2011

55 Forge (24 inch diameter pan) where bricks (2 bricks high) were used to reshape the fire and make it deeper. Notice there there is not a lot of gasses or flame escaping to top of the fire.  There is a nice hot fireball. For reference that is a 3 inch wide leaf spring being heated.

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Add some bricks to make the fire deeper.  Cut a hole in the far side of the forge to allow long material to pass through. Does not have to be much wider than the material.

When you use wood, make the fire deep enough to burn the wood to charcoal, and the charcoal to embers while you forge. Process the wood down till you have small pieces that will burn rather quickly. Try 2x4x4 or 2x2x2 inches, or 1 or 2 inch wide sheeting about 4 inches long.  This allows you to use very little air when forging and the fuel tends to make embers on its own.

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When I get my jabod up to burning steel uh... I mean welding heat it goes through fuel pretty fast.  Make sure you have enough to hand. One other thing that I like about a jabod is I haven't found a fuel that isn't fairly easy to adapt it to.

Pnut

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Nothing wrong with making charcoal, but it is one more process. 

As described above, you will be making charcoal as you forge. 

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I meant on the table while you are welding. The smaller the pieces the quicker they burn up. I always try to have more fuel ready to go in the fire than I think I'll need if I'm trying to weld whether the fuel is wood, anthracite,corn etc. If I'm going to try to forge weld I like to have everything prepared so I have a better chance of getting it done on the first go round.

Pnut

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