picker77

Spring fuller from 1" keyed shaft stock

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Figured out what to do with at least a few inches of that 28' of 1" keyed shafting that followed me home. Have a few more things in mind, but this is a good start because it will be useful right away. 3/16" x 1" 1018 for the spring, 7/8" solid for the hardy stub, nice close fit, no wobble, works great.

 

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Dang, Picker, that's nice lookin'.  You did a good job on it.  That's a tool I want to make for my arsenal as soon as I get up and running.  You obviously have a welder, something else I need to get hold of.

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Thanks, Chris. I'm getting ready to make a second one with the dies in line with the anvil face, which would probably be more convenient for some types of things, in particular working with long stock. But the die position on this one (perpendicular to the anvil face), should be ok in most circumstances. My biggest problem with effective fullering or drawing and tapering is typical "old-guy" arthritis, especially in my wrists and hands. Turns out that continually "rolling" a pair of tongs 90 degrees a pop the same direction every one or two hammer blows quickly destroys my left wrist for the day. With a "double" action fuller like this, I only have to flip the tongs forward and backward 90 degrees, a repetitive action requiring far less rotational movement. This (I hope) will equate to much reduced stress on the wrist holding the tongs. That's my theory, anyway. LOL.

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Well, you did a good job.  I wish I still had access to my own machine shop..............I'd build a guillotine fuller.  But, alas, all that precision equipment is long gone.  I might try and cobble something up with a bolted together fuller. 

I sure understand the arthritis thing.  The knuckles of my right hand give me pain all the time....................but even more when I spend a day carving wood or an evening hammering steel.  Maybe I should switch my hobby to hot-tubing or hammock swinging.  ;)

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Just finished the 45 degree sister to the first one. Funny, I haven't seen any others like this with the angled dies... maybe it's a bad idea or something, ha. But I think I'll like using it more than the other one because it allows me to keep my tongs closer to my body in a more natural position, and the bonus is long stock will be easier to do. They both were sized lengthwise to place the dies in the anvil's sweet spot. Next I need to make a couple of different kinds of hot cut (regular and butcher), and maybe a bulletproof plate for the top of my poor victim anvil. And if anybody's wondering why my hardy base stubs are so long, it's to (a) knock it out from the bottom if ever needed; and (B) Someday I might get a bigger anvil. :)

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You my want a set with the dies arc'd a bit by grinding or forging so you can slide a piece along the dies' axis to make a long fullered section---like many sword blades have. Sharp ends are not good for such work.

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Excellent thought, Mr. Powers. Thank you. That little light bulb had not glimmered in my mind yet, and I'll certainly remember it. Lord knows I'm not going to run out of tool/die material, ha. I was thinking also it might be possible to create a "spring hot cutter" along the same lines, similar to this second (angled) fuller. It would have a sharp chisel-shaped hardened upper die that would strike down on a partially flattened unhardened lower "anvil" die. The idea is to have an accurate hot cutter for small (1" and under) stock that would totally avoid risking damage to the face of a hammer or anvil.

It was 102 inside the shop this afternoon about 4 PM. Even with two big fans running, it was no fun. I must have downed at least a gallon of water. That's why this second fuller was probably a bit less carefully built compared to the first. I'm ashamed to admit I got in a bit of a hurry to finish, clean up the shop, and get the heck back to the house for a shower, some A/C, and my favorite end-of-day brew, which is "Cave Dweller" from the Black Mesa Brewery in Chris The Curious' home town of Norman, OK. Rumor has it we have a cool front on the way, might even see some lower 90's later this week. I sure hope so.

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"Cold Front"?????  Well, it'll probably feel like it.  I spent an hour grinding on my forge body today and I think I lost 30 pounds in sweat!

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