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royalpaste

Mystery "spring steel" from semi repair lot

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Hello, so in my searches for "high carbon" steel I called a semi repair yard and asked if they had any leaf springs. They said they did and when I went to pick it up I got the leaf spring but I also got thisBURST20190628120924648_COVER.thumb.jpg.ed24acecea866284d39f26b60d646aaa.jpg

It's almost a half inch thick in places and would probably work for hammers, and striking tools (alot of moving metal though). But I'm not really sure if it is spring steel

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I doubt it is spring steel, looks like a crank handle for raising and lowering the trailer front support wheels.  It is still useful though should make good punches & drifts, kinda small for hammers.

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Hmm any junkyard metals you'd recommend for hammers and such? Only really got scrap yards as my source of anything but mild steel

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Tortion bars and axle/cv shafts should make some good hammer material. 

I know I've seen some good threads on here that mention useful parts of cars/trucks, and scrapyard find parts that are useful. A websearch with iforgeiron after should bring them up. 

Just be careful with coated stuff and no plated stuff. 

As for your mystery piece, spark test the known spring then spark test that one and compare. Also spark test chart is available online and is useful as a "guideline".

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2 hours ago, royalpaste said:

But I'm not really sure if it is spring steel

Looks like spring steel to me.  Unless the picture is deceiving I'm guessing the top piece is about 3 inches wide and probably closer to 3/4 inch thick at the thickest spots. Research spark tests and then do a comparison to guesstimate the carbon content, or you can always cut off a small section and try to harden it to see if it has the properties you want.

I have forged some leaf springs from semi trailers or tractors before.  They do not move easily under a hand hammer.   I suggest S cam shafts instead if you want material for making hammers. If that place does a lot of brake jobs they should have a good supply.

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Good hammer stock can be had at tool rentals, ask for worn jack hammer bits. The Home Depot near me sold me a couple for $1.00 ea. I went back a while later to pick some up for a friend and talked to a different counter guy who made me take the whole bucket. He said it was cheaper than paying a guy to haul them to the scrap yard.

Hey, don't get the idea I'm an easy mark, I made him give me the bucket too!

If you don't have a power hammer you'll want someone you trust with a sledge hammer striking, it doesn't move real easy under the hammer. Good stock.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Large axles, hydraulic rams, machinery shafting, bucket pins, etc would be good tough steels suitable for hammers. Look for parts that are under stress and not brittle hard.

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It is a leaf spring. It is off a peterbilt with a low air leaf suspension.

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Welcome aboard Luke, glad to have you. If you'll put your general location in the header you might be surprised how many members live within visiting distance.

EXCELLENT first post Luke, you certainly know how to make an entrance. Heavy duty mechanic perhaps?

Frosty The Lucky.

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Thanks for the welcome. Long time lurker.didn,t post until i thought i had info. to share

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