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Dwithrow84

Help Hay-Budden

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So this Hay-Budden anvil just popped up on Facebook today and was wondering if they make good anvils and what you guys thought would be a good offer. The post says "These are listed on the internet for $1000 to $3000. I’m looking for the best offer. I don’t want to move this heavy beast."  

I am currently using an old piece of rail road track so this would be a nice up grade but not necessarily a must right now either since im just starting out. Let me know what you guys think62589751_10157673477387345_5001452994869329920_n.jpg.fee3d5f713a25e5c478e76d31a28d52a.jpg62578916_10157673475882345_9117312264771207168_n.jpg.80a31534f1f8f6e94e2d13f6b8918412.jpg62426594_10157673475887345_8584139603080904704_n.jpg.8938c506f2fafbc2ab99706ec2a7d117.jpg

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That appears to me to be a 148 pound anvil.  Hay Budden is a good brand, but that one does have some edge damage.  It's probably still a good user.  However, to put things in perspective, you can buy a brand new 165 pound Ridgid anvil for a little over $1300 US.  Just because some other sucker bought an overpriced used anvil online does not mean it was a wise purchase or that price is the going rate.  In the anvil world 148 pounds hardly qualifies as a "beast" btw, but it is a good size for most hobby smith projects.

I don't know what anvils are bringing in your area, but I'd be a buyer at $2 -$3 per pound if it has good rebound, there's no additional damage beyond what I can see in the pictures, and there are no signs of improper repairs.  I'd definitely buy a new anvil before spending close to the same money on that one.

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 Yeah, it's a pass. You can buy larger, pristine brand new for not much more. That'd be too steep even in Alaska near Anchorage or other large city. In the bush would be different maybe but everything is different in the bush.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Subjective anvil weights seldom are anywhere near accurate.  I've had multiple auctioneers tell me that 60# is a "large" "heavy" anvil. (So much so that I stopped asking weight and started asking how many people it took to lift it.  Then gave up on auctions and went to the TPAAAT and stocked up on anvils!)

Many sellers are surprised at the suggestion to put it on a bathroom scale.  Evidently they seem to believe that human flesh weighs differently from metal.  Bathroom scales can deal with the majority of anvils in my experience and then the scale at the feed store will handle the rest!

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I stopped going to auctions at all, everything is puffed (exaggerated) to stupid levels and the company shills will run up the bids if they don't make the company's minimum. Any rusty or weathered tool is a "rare, vintage, antique". The last anvil I saw at auction, a 50 kg. Chinese cast iron ASO had the auctioneer puffing it for a good 20 minutes before he opened the bidding.

If an anvil is too heavy for a bathroom scale, bridge to another scale with a piece of lumber, put the anvil on it and add the readings. You probably won't need to subtract the weight of the lumber unless you really want to.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Two scales, Frosty? something akin to a double standard? Do not subtract the lumber? you are tare ing me up! Sorry, lightweight pun :-0.

Robert Taylor

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Go ahead Robert, pound it and you won't have to tell a gram it. 

How's that for a weak, (zero Gee!) pun?

Frosty The Lucky.

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