Recommended Posts

Hey all! I am getting my first big hammer this week. Woohoo! 

I’ll be picking up a 250# Murray hammer this week (similar in a lot of ways to a Little Giant of the same weight).The only problem is, it’s in Washington state and I live in Georgia. The drive isn’t the problem, it is safely moving the hammer I’m concerned about.

I was planning on hauling the hammer in the bed of my F450 flatbed. It should handle the weight without much issue (approx 5500#) but I am still debating on having it standing up or laying down. With the machinery I have available, it would be much easier to have it stay standing. 

My question is, is this an absolutely horrible idea to have a huge hammer standing up in the bed of my flatbed? I am pretty sure the hammers have the weight centered in the sow block, but it is still going to be top-heavy. If I’m driving 2515 miles with hammer in my truck though, I want to do it right. If I need to lay it down to be safer, I will 100% figure out a way! 

Thank you very much for any help you can give!

 -RM

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While it could be done either way, it is absolutely safer laying down. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A high center of gravity can rock your vehicle. One sudden stop or a corner to make things go sideways. (pun intended). 

Be certain to measure the total height of the vehicle and load, with properly inflated tires.  Leave additional room for vehicle bounce. Bridges with an arch over the drive lanes sometimes have one height for the middle of the arch and another height for the edge of the arch. You want to be sure you can go under things with room to spare.

Tie the load down so it can not move and check the bindings early and often to see that they are still tight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good Morning,

Height restriction for the highway is 14 feet. Weight restriction is GVW for vehicle (vehicle plus everything in and on the deck). Not being a Commercial Vehicle, you do not 'HAVE TO' stop at Highway Scales. Their concern is, weight on each tire causing undo pressure on the pavement (Truckers call this 'Ground Pressure').

Look at the sidewall of your tires, there is a maximum load rating. If you are under the load rating of the tires, under 14 feet high, you should be good to go. Yes, it will make the vehicle more stable if the load was lower. You can make a crib with wood blocks, to support the load on it's side.

I have shipped Power Hammers east to west. figure out how much it will cost you in fuel, accomodation and meals to make the trip. Phone a few reputable Freight Companies and ask for a quote from point A to point B. They will want to know the foot print and weight. It might be less expensive for you to stay home. The big trucks are running everyday and they are always looking for loads. You will be surprised how inexpensive it is.

Neil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it possible to get a small trailer? I picked up my Anyang 88 in Decatur Tx, and live in southern AZ, it weighs right around 4000#  I used a trailer used to transport scissor lifts. Also, I used chain boomers... made sure the thing was not going ANYWHERE.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, arftist said:

While it could be done either way, it is absolutely safer laying down. 

Duly noted. I called up another friend as well who said the same thing. 

 

51 minutes ago, Glenn said:

Be certain to measure the total height of the vehicle and load, with properly inflated tires.  Leave additional room for vehicle bounce.

Absolutely. Upon some measurements, it would work in theory, but safer is far, far better in my opinion. Should I disassemble the hammer any before transport? I’ll have a full day to tinker before leaving WA back to GA. 

34 minutes ago, swedefiddle said:

I have shipped Power Hammers east to west. figure out how much it will cost you in fuel, accomodation and meals to make the trip. Phone a few reputable Freight Companies and ask for a quote from point A to point B. You will be surprised how inexpensive it is.

Neil,

thanks so much for the info! I have looked into the freight option, but it was notably more expensive than gas for me. I will be camping for most of the drive, and I already had the truck. I had this whole week free too so it works out well I suppose... (maybe I won’t agree after the long drive :D) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Greetings 556, 

           You can just rent a car hauling tandem from  U haul for cheap and save yourself A two ton aggravation. Much easier to load and unload. Just this ol boys 2c. 

Forge on and make beautiful things 

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Will you be traveling from Atlanta to Washington with an empty load? You may want to consider picking up a load to help offset the gas costs. I would mention where to look for loads, but my post would probably be deleted and I would be issued another 2 warnings for advertising and swearing. Apparently, an advertisement is like swearing on this site, lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hauled my 50# LG laying flat on my car hauler fully assembled. I laid it on tires for cushion and cribbing for solidity. I tied it down with pro trucker size nylon cargo straps. I worked road maintenance and you find them along the highways all the time everybody had more than they needed. Chains and binders are good but cross tie them, chain has NO stretch so they can vibrate or bounce loose. Get out, take a leak and walk around the load every 2 hrs or so, especially if something loosens up ONCE. 

Mine rode clean with the motor up but I was ready to pull it if necessary. 

It'd be safe enough hauling it upright on your rig (without me looking up the vehicle specs that is) if YOU'RE up to hauling a top heavy load. It WILL be top heavy and ruts in the pavement are going to scare blank out of you till you get used to anticipating and avoiding them. Duallies are more susceptible to ruts than intuition says they should be but they're more stable even so. 

Stick to main highways, take plenty of breaks ALWAYS check the load and truck TIRES! every time. Just make it a habit to do a walk around. Stop and do a sort of unfocused eyeball from a distance when you stop AFTER taking a break. You'll be AMAZED how something wrong will JUMP OUT at you with a distant scan. Take it slow and easy and don't be afraid to sit out bad weather.

Were I not semi disabled I'd make the haul, up or down on the truck or trailer. 

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had mine shipped it wasn't to expensive and alot cheaper than me driving up and back to get it i asked for it to be delivered on a truck with a lift gate and a strong enough pallet jack .WE had it off the truck and in place pretty quick very little lifting and rigging required.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check height clearance on everything.  

The 11 foot 8 Bridge (formally known as the Norfolk Southern–Gregson Street Overpassand nicknamed The Can-Opener) is a railroad bridge in Durham, North Carolina, United States, that has attracted media coverage and popular attention because tall vehicles such as trucks, buses, and RVs frequently collide with the unusually low overpass, resulting in damage ranging from RV roof air conditioners being scraped off to entire truck roofs being removed.The 79-year-old bridge along South Gregson Street provides only 11 feet 8 inches (3.56 m) of vertical clearance. It cannot be raised because nearby railroad crossings would also have to be raised with it. The street also cannot be lowered because a major sewer line runs only four feet (1.2 m) under Gregson Street.

Gregson Street is a one-way street going southbound, so the bridge is only hit from the north side. Despite numerous signs and warning devices, a truck crashes into the bridge on average at least once a month. Most crashes involve rental trucks, even though rental agencies warn renters about the under-height bridges in the area.

There is a bridge with 10 Foot 6 Bridge in Westwood, Massachusetts

ALWAYS check height clearance on everything you want to go under.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Note that it you lay it down make sure it's cradled properly to NOT put undue stress on relatively fragile parts of it's anatomy!

Most major machinery damage occurs in moves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had hammers back hauled from points south and west (I'm in the NE USA) by a local trucking company that occasionally has empty trucks in an odd part of the country and just wants to cover fuel expenses on the way home.  Couple of hundred bucks as long as seller and buyer are flexable enough to wait for the right trucking situation.  Call a local outfit and ask about back hauling.

Failing that, rent or borrow a trailer and you can haul it from here to tomorrow with the 450.  I would suggest that laying one down and standing it up again safely is on the prerequisite skill list for owning big equipment.  Or at least you should know someone who can do it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just hauled a Moloch 250 this last weekend Roughly 750 miles. I stood mine up. I could be wrong, but I thought I had read somewhere that the chance of breaking the hammer is higher when laying down. And then add in the quality of our roads in Canada and that just raises that risk higher. 

What I do is a chain around the sow block pulling forward, a chain around sow block pulling backward, a chain to the top pulling sideways, another chain to the top pulling to the other side. Safety wire all boomers, make sure the chains are screaming tight on both ends of each chain. 

Next I put four 2” wratchet straps rated for 2200lbs each going all 4 directions as added safety. 

 The hammer is on a flat deck trailer with tandem 7000lb axles. I would absolutely NOT haul this big of a hammer on a F550 let alone a F450. 

 This is the second 250lb hammer i’ve Hauled over 700 miles with no issues. 

 

Timber

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed, upright is safer for the hammer. I used a LOT of cribbing when I laid my 50# LG on it's side to haul and only tied it down directly over points supported by cribbing so there were no bending forces on it. Heck, I laid the base course of cribbing to stiffen flex by the trailer's deck planks and bridge the steel cross members. 

It was IIRC 275 mile trip over Alaska rough roads and the chains didn't even scuff the paint. Rigging it to stand up as it slid off the trailer was the trickiest part of the move. Having concrete floors lets me move it precisely with a pinch bar, no sweat. It's held in position in the shop with a pin in a gozinta. It's not a hard mount but it can't go walkabout. 

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just remember that there are more than a few mountains between WA & GA, and you need to account for any additional stresses caused by the hammer leaning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did someone say Norfolk Southern??? :D  Congratulations on the hammer. Are you in the Alex Bealer group? One of the Goat and Hammer crowd?  I need to get back down there, half of my stuff is still in storage in Marietta, including my best anvils.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.