G George

Hay Budden Anvil clean or not to clean

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I just bought an anvil, (Hay Budden 130 lb), a swage block that has the corner missing, and 2 buckets of tools, 1 hammers, 1 tongs and a 3rd bucket 1/4 full of hardy tools.

My question is should I clean the anvil??  The fellow I bought it from took a twisted wire wheel to the swage block, and I showed up in time to stop him from doing the same to the anvil.

The anvil was brought here from Forsyth Montana, and was an anvil at Burlington northern railroad, the anvils # is A25928, and it has a 091 on the side at the heel. a member told me it was from 1920 but what does the A stand for?? I would like to keep as much history as I can with this anvil. I am not a collector, but I think I got a pretty good deal for what I got.

Pics to follow....G George

The vise is a 7.5" that I picked up separately, and am in the process of loosening it up enough to get the lower bolt out, and get it working free, the probably sell it. Should it be left rusty or should I paint it??

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The A in the serial number is from when Hay Budden started over in 1918 with the A prefix A1-A12000 for their serial numbers. The only thing I would do with that anvil is to wipe it down with some BLO or Ballistol and hammer hot steel on it to shine up the face. Hope you have read about not doing any grinding, milling or welding on her hardened face.

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For using folks, wire brushing is ok, especially if done lightly. For most folks Painting is a bad idea as many of us have run into anvils with flaws or bad repairs trying to be concealed by paint.  (If you were buying a used car and they told you it had never been in a wreck; but 2 fenders had been repainted would that make you want to increase the price you would pay or doubt their veracity...)

That's a great postvise and I would take it apart and wire brush it and then oil it.  I sure hope you have the screw and screwbox for it.  They and what condition they are in make up about 80% of the price of a vise in my opinion.  Everything else can be repaired fairly fast and easily, they are a pain to redo!

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Sir's; Yes I know not to try to repair, weld, and or grind it, but thank you for a reminder!  Where to find Ballistol, is it an oil? autoparts, lumberyard, online?? I will do a search unless you fellows know a good source. I am going to use this, but not abuse it, I would like to retain it's value as a collectable. I do have the screw and screwbox for the vise, that thing weighs like 170 lbs.  Missing are the spring and mount. Figured on making the mount and trying to find a buggy seat spring for the missing spring( I live next to a Mennonite community) so a seat spring should be a common find.

I wanted to buy a new anvil as everyone thinks they have a chunk of Gold, or the sentimental attachment( grandpa used this for most his life) . Any idea what the anvil is worth alone? Is that a low serial #, being a RR anvil would that bring the RR guys into the market??   What do you think the swage is woth, 4" thick 15"x15" before being broken.    I would like to know as I am insuring the tools I just got in my homeowners policy. I also scored a champion cast forge with blower and hood, 3' x 4', 4" vise, Gas forge, so I am about ready to have some fun.

Gentlemen I thank you for your advise and it is well received!!

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Gun shops, sporting goods, wal-mart, etc

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Posted (edited)

Ballistol is a firearms lube

 

Edited by pnut

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Thank You, I have not messed with weapons since my army days and that was a looong time ago..

G George

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That Hay Budden is a great user anvil. Those minor chips and pits are nothing. It's one with a solid steel upper half welded at the waist rather than full wrought iron except for the steel faceplate. They are good tough anvils. It was an improvement over only having the just the steel faceplate. 

There is no problem with just wire wheeling it. I used flat spraycan engine clearcoat on one of my anvils I cleaned up (except for the face which got a light wipe of boiled linseed oil on it) and have had no problems, and nothing is hidden, tho I plan to keep it. I've also just used BLO on my other anvils. The face doesn't need anything on it if you are using it. You could oil or wax it if it will be sitting. 

 

 

With no badge or stamping in the anvil to prove it was part of the rr property, it's really just a story. 

That big plate would make a nice stake plate. 

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Some use will polish the face right up. Thin coat of blo and you're in business. Looks to be in pretty good shape. Lots of miles left on it. Use it in good health.

Pnut (Mike)

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Thanks to all!! The fellow I bought it from I have known for 25 years, his dad got this from the RR so I believe him, but you are right with no provenance, it is just a story, albeit true.

After all the input I am just going to go after it with a nylon brush, some simple green, and then the Ballistol , I thank you all for the valuable input. I am going to join BAM , Blacksmith Association of Missouri and start going to some of their clinics, anvil repair is one I would like to attend to get the little torch cut on the heel repaired, but that is down the road.

My end goal is to leave it to the next user in as good or better condition than I found it in.

G George

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I only know a couple of anvil collectors and that is a fairly modern common anvil, (single piece upper indicates more modern that anvils with a forge welded face on them). It's a *tool*! Use it and don't abuse it and it will make the next century with no problem.

I have a an anvil from the RR shop in Columbus Ohio, when they shut it down; one of the smiths snagged it and I bought it from his son.  So no hard provenance; but it was part of a Blacker Hammer and they were often used by railroads; doesn't make a bit of difference in its usability!

As for value: talk with the BAM people for local prices; what it's worth here in Mexico is probably not applicable to your situation!

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That torch cut won't affect the usability. If they know a way to fix it without getting into major work on the whole anvil I guess,... but otherwise it isn't anything to even worry about. I don't see it getting in the way of anything you'd use the pritchel hole for. 

My Hay Budden with the solid steel upper is chisel marked all over the face but it doesn't affect the work I produce on it. 

I wasn't knocking its history, but you get what I was pointing out. 

Now get forging and show us what you make on it. :)

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