Recommended Posts

So I've been looking up guillotine tools. I'd like to make one but I'm not so sure I'm comfortable enough with my skills to make one that works really well. Any designs you guys have made that are easier or harder? Not even that I need one but it seems it would be super handy when an occasion arises. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have a welder? If not you can rivet it together.

Just make it stronger than you need. Tolerances between the die and the guide are a consideration and leave a way to easily clean out any debris from the bottom of the tool.  Construction is straight forward otherwise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got a stick and a cheap 120v mig. I'd like to make one like the smithing magician but idk how I'd cut the holes in the plates. How much do shops charge for something small like that usually?

id also like to just bolt it together to be able to used different size tools, just change spacers out. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cut the holes?  A machinist would drill them, a blacksmith would hot punch them. (grin)

You do not need holes if you just weld the plated together.

guillotine tool.JPG

nick09.jpg

 

And a riveted version

IMG_20170525_114939230.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was meaning like how the smithing magician has the front as one solid piece with the big square hole in it to run stock through. The bottom one seems like the easiest to make for me. I've seen the top one and I think I'd make it crooked welding it one way or another. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a guy on ETSY that sells a guillotine tool kit (xxxx), cut and ready to weld for $40.  Can't provide a commercial link here, but if you have decent welding skills that seems like a pretty easy way to go.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing to consider is how tall you make the tool, if you are using it on your anvil. Too tall and it's tiring to use hammering on something much higher than anvil height.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That third one Glenn posted looks like it would be the easiest to make. The one that appears to be the most versatile would be the second. Although the 1st one, which looks like it is the same style GS Tongs makes, would be almost as versatile. 

I have never used one of these, but have watched a few reviews. One problem with those like the third style, those like the one on the Etsy site, and others in the Smithing Magician style is lack of visibility and inability to use the tool from the side. 

When the day comes that I make my own, I expect it will be a copy of the second one. My only concern is how do you remove a die if you deform the top die?  I plan to drill holes and thread them so I can remove the front plate. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The third guillotine only needs a hack saw, hand drill, bits and hardware. 

This is mine though not a great picture. The arm and dies are at 45* to each other so I can use it to cut long stock or say fuller a long section. Long stock will pass the post either direction. One thing I'd do differently is NOT weld the hardy shank under the bottom die, I should've put it behind the post so the dies were centered over the anvil's sweet spot and aligned with a side edge. The dies are 5/16" x 2"  leaf spring and I have plenty left over to make whatever dies I might need for a while.  

Frosty The Lucky.

232207353_Smithinmagician14.thumb.jpg.5f1108dda4bdf2fdc657906f0837db68.jpg    1987270485_Smithinmagician12.thumb.jpg.14a817418c0fdcc431a4f31f6d9a282d.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the tool accepts dies, make more blanks than you need.  You can grab a couple of blanks and weld on what ever working end you need.

Making a guillotine tool, I followed the plans exactly as shown.  2 weeks of use later the guillotine tool was no longer usable due to what I called a design flaw.  Used that knowledge to redesign, rebuild, and create the improved version. Several years later, the new version has had some hard use, production runs, and is still in use.  The one improvement was to drill a hole in both the top and bottom die so they can be held together as a pair with light wire. Does not seem like much when you have only a few dies, but as the number grows looking for the matching die can be a pain.

Disregard the wanting it to be done right the first time. The first one is just a prototype and can be improved upon. Once the prototype is in production you will see ways to modify things. Take notes and then build the improved version, that works better. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've not pulled the trigger on making/buying one yet, but from what I've seen what is likely to drive the long term cost of ownership is the die material.  Buying known die materials (such as 4140) that aren't mild steel quickly exceed the initial cost of the holding tool with just a couple die sets.  I'd say pick the die size that you can stomach the material costs for and still accomplish what you expect from it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For dies I use pieces of leaf springs from semi trailers or tractors.  If you can find even one that has 7 or more in the stack you will probably have a lifetime supply of die material.  You will have to heat them to take the slight curve out.  After that you can choose to heat treat or not.  I don't and they hold up better than mild steel, but the struck ends do experience some deformation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My son drives a dump truck and the company replaces the entire spring set when one leaf breaks. I had to tell him not to bring me any more because I have several hundred pounds already. Some leaves even have a straight section in the middle. You might ask at a truck company or truck repair shop. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just recently made this out of 30 inchs of 1/2 round stock. Not interchangable dies but useful for fullering.

Another smith gave me a dead simple diagram and it took an hour, a hammer and a vise. Fullerdiagram.jpg.db2e3efd11f395a415c9fc7f42e92f25.jpg

FullerSpring.jpg.dfe239fd9f699565f871f4484c87abf4.jpg

. Need to make one out of spring steel next

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I make these to suit but it's a spring tool not a guillotine. 

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Frosty, that looks like one I just saw on blacksmithing joeys YouTube. Hi May have been bigger though. I do like the idea of spring fillers though but the guillotine just seems "neater" or "fancier". I will probably start with a spring fuller or two and just make a guillotine in time. Might start making some since my fingers messed up. I think I can forge with it but I wanna give it a good week or more before I even try. Fabricating should be fine though. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's info in new edge of the anvil on making a spring fuller like the one above minus the hardy shank. 36 in. round bar flatten the middle 8 inches and bend into a circle leaving the jaws about an inch apart.

Pnut (Mike)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

here's my home made guillotine tool it has dies made from c45 steel that are made from old keys from gear trains that whe've had to replace at work. i have a flat set and 2 angled sets and need to make a couple of round ones 

IMG_20181026_164248.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks good. I bet it comes in handy pretty often.

Pnut (Mike)   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i use it almost every time i'm forging. i only wish i made it a bit larger so i could fit lager stock. but works like a champ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How did you get the right angles? I'm guessing the angle is whats marked on the tool? All I could figure is using a mill. At least to get perfect angles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

band saw at work and a bit of filing 

when i'm using them i realy need to use ear protection because they make a XXXX of a lot of high pitch noise when hitting them, i think a combination of the anvil and the tool together seen as its loos in the hardy hole. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.