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Hey guys. I was just wondering what this stuff is made out of. I came across one today, and this sucker is about 40lbs. Ive seen a few discussions about it, and some say 5160, and others around 1075 considering it apparently takes a good hamon?

Any response would be great!

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Aside from if anyone has more knowledge, I would spark test it and test heat treat a piece before going through the trouble of making blades from it if that was your intention. 

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Greetings Backwiods,

       They make great Hardy dishing tools . Lots of different functions. 

Forge on and make beautiful things 

Jim

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I've made hammers from them; works fairly well.

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Hello;
 

Quenched in mineral fast oil; which makes it WAY too hard for a hammer (around HRC 64);  cleaned up both faces; then heated up the drift to bright red; and let it sit untill both clean side were going to purples - I was aiming for HRC50 - 55 . 

Checking for cracks is always good, I found a couple in the tip. I always grind a piece clean with coarse grits; Then I dunk it in cooling liquid (water with oil), then warm it up slowly. Cracks will become visible due to the boiling black goo :-) I've always found this method somewhat "improvised"; does anyone have a better way to check for cracks ?

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quenching is supposed to make it hard,  that is why we temper after to bring it where its wanted.  Max hardness is mostly a function of alloy type and getting  proper conversion to martensite 

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Dye penetrant testing is one way. Spray the dye on, let  sit for a bit then wipe it off. Spray the chalky material over the part and watch for where the dye bleeds into the chalk.

Magnaflux - some automotive machine shops have these to test for cracks in heads and blocks.

Zyglo testing- similar to dye penetrant but an ultraviolet light is used to see the dye.

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The topic of shop expedient crack checking might be a good subject of it's own. Dykem layout fluid works pretty well in this capacity. In Dad's shop we'd transfer blue prints to sheet steel, aluminum, whatever, to make a permanent template or cut out precise parts. It is VERY penetrating and reveals cracks when sanded off. 

I don't believe that's its intended purpose but it is hard as heck to clean off mechanically, it gets in every nook and cranny. I just looked at Dykem company and they make a bunch of different kinds of makers and fluids, they may have a crack detection product but I don't want to search the site.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Thank you Frosty for that excellent idea. Thze Germans have their own version of Dykem blue; which is called Diamant anreis fluid. 

It's a scribing fluid like dykem; but non reflective. It's thinner than water; and gets in even the tiny cracks. Works well.

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I appreciate all the responses, thanks guys. And unfortunately I'm not able to spark test, considering I'm still fresh into this without any power tools. But once I get a little free time, I'll quench a few pieces and figure out what gets the best results.

And yes, the idea was to use it for blades later on, once I get better at this. I just like getting info ahead of time.

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Generally I try to start with stuff that is close to the final dimensions on a project---particularly one where decarburization would be a problem; so I don't make hammer heads from 1/4" sheet or blades from 1.5" round.  Of course if you have a large powerhammer that changes things...

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On 4/30/2019 at 5:21 AM, BartW said:

Diamant anreis fluid.  It's a scribing fluid

Ayup, that should work nicely, maybe not what it's for but it shows every flaw, cracks should show like beacons. Dykem sure does. 

What Thomas said. Beast guy, Starting close to the finish line makes the journey shorter and easier. Yes? I have about a 450 lb. coil spring I salvaged when a local moved and left . . . junk. The wire is 2.2" dia. IIRC The coil is 12.5" dia. C-C. Lots of possibilities in that coil I just haven't realized one of them yet. Oh, there's another spring just like it laying on that vacant lot.

Frosty The Lucky.

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