J.P. Hall

Diamond stone hand sanding

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I'm currently finish grinding a 6" kitchen knife. I don't mind hand sanding itself, but I find that constantly changing paper gets old pretty quickly. Does anyone have experience using diamond stones for hand sanding? They're rigid and flat, and the a good quality stone shouldn't have any issue with the grit wearing out. They're available in a fairly wide range of grits as well. I haven't seen this discussed, and hopefully it would save a little time and money in the long run, if not just making it a little more pleasant. Decent sized stones would also serve double duty for sharpening.

I'm considering getting a set of DMT "credit card" sharpeners to test with a rigid backing. A set of 3 grits (325, 600, 1200) is $25 on amazon. I don't expect that diamond stones would replace sandpaper entirely, but they may help - especially for those still improving their grinding for evening out bevels and getting a more uniform finish before moving on to paper.

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Should work though I don't know how long they'll last. No the grit won't wear out but the adhesives will eventually fail and the grit will fall off.  I think $25 is worth a try though.

Frosty The Lucky.

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DMT laps typically are nickel bonded  to the substrate, backing, etcetera. Diamonds DO wear out. I have worn out quite a few diamond laps, I have found DMT laps to be very durable. Even high quality monolithic diamonds experience wear. The more expensive stones (octohedrons) get unbrazed and rotated in their mounts, and finally, reground. Soft steel is toughest on a polycrystalin lap, less so for hard steel, less so for carbide. I would definitely give it a try.

In the meantime, I am still pondering your question.

Robert Taylor

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DMT seems to be the way to go. They're monocrystalline, and from what I've researched the majority of the diamond is below the surface of the nickel. Of all the diamond and bonding types, I'd imagine this would be the most durable. 

Another hope is that they would last longer hand sanding because of the increased contact area, and thus decreased pressure on individual diamonds compared to sharpening a knife edge.

I'm wonder how much people spend on sandpaper, and if these would be worth it even as a long-term consumable

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