Sign in to follow this  
Jason Fry

Wrought Iron and Laminate/San Mai

Recommended Posts

I've got some wrought iron wagon rim that I'd like to incorporate into a knife blade.  I have done "regular" damascus and san mai, but have not worked much with wrought. 

The rim is in the .3" range thick at the moment.  I plan to forge it down a little, but how far can I go?  I'm assuming I can run it through the power hammer at yellow heat?

Next I'll grind off the scale and laminate it to a piece of blade steel.  I've got 1084 and W2 both on hand in 1/4" and 3/16 thick.  This would leave my final billet as thick as perhaps .6 or so after welding.  

Again using the hammer, I assume this three layer stack of wrought/blade/wrought can be drawn out lengthwise?  Will the different rates of movement of the wrought vs. the core cause me problems here?

After forging to profile, I figured to quench at near full thickness and grind in the bevels.  Any considerations for quenching?  Do I need a faster or slower oil to deal with the cladding?

The rim I have came from my great great grandfather, and is fairly irreplaceable.  I'd like to get this one right. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So try it on one without the extra value. Don't "learn" or "experiment" on irreplaceable material!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried this once, and failed. The problem being carbon migration from the core to the clad. Main reasons being:

1. The high heat needed to work the WI

2. The long forging time, due to the need to work the piece very hot.

3. The core being very thin at the final forging - I made a kitchen knife.

Take this into consideration. And as Thomas suggested - experiment first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this