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FivePointsForge

14” Crown Bowie

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Forged 5160, deer crown, mild steel fittings. 

Full tang, threaded and peened. 

Antiqued with a wretched smelling home brew of  whatever I had around the house that was acidic ;)

Lastly, my lousy sheath. Always an afterthought, but practical. One day when I’m satisfied with my forging, I’ll practice my leatherwork. Which pretty much means that I’ll never practice my leatherwork. 

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Very nice. Like the fittings.

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Did you try some tea on the fittings, also temper colors work well on fittings though they will wear, can be done on purpose...Also if you are going for a original aged look look into staining the antler...

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Thanks guys.

Mr. Powers, I had the antler dyed at one point in the process but decided to revert back to the natural colors, so I sanded it and treated it with my linseed oil, beeswax, pine tar mixture instead, which should allow the material to darken naturally and fairly quickly in my experience. The light colored areas aren’t nearly as bright as they look in the photos. I’m planning to work on my photography skills immediately after I improve my leatherwork lol. 

As for tea, no I have not yet tried that. In the past I’ve mostly used a chemical called Insta-blak by EPI, which is intended for blackening stainless steel, but I’ve found it to be extremely flexible in various dilutions for darkening just about any ferrous or non-ferrous metal. For this particular knife, for whatever reason, I opted to experiment with a home mixture (this was coffee, balsamic vinegar, a jar of old salsa, etc). 

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Nice knife. All around nice look. 

 

About the Insta-blak, how does that finish hold up to general, non-abusive use?  I want to experiment on some stainless steel. 

Hawk

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15 hours ago, hawk18 said:

 

Thank you Hawk, truly appreciate the praise. 

The oxidation that the Insta-blak creates seems very tough. I’ve used it on lots of different projects, one of which was to “antique” a stainless .45 cal revolver and a stainless lever action .45-70 rifle, both of which have seen plenty of use and (non-gentle) carry through some fairly heavy brush and those have held up flawlessly. As far as on blades and fittings, I only still own and use one knife that I’ve used it on, all plain steel, and it hasn’t really shown any wear. I’ve used it on everything from guitar hardware to firearms and have yet to be disappointed. 

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