Gimpl

Do I Upgrade/Is this an Upgrade

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Hello Everyone,

I am trying to figure out if I am thinking correctly here. I bought a 200 lb Trenton about 3 months ago that I have since learned had the face surfaced and in the process flatend 2/3rds of the horn on the top. The face has about 3/16th of the top plate and about 70% rebound across most of it until you get past the hardy hole at which point it is 40% to the heel. I use it and it performs fine for me with no issues and enjoy the anvil. I have a buyer who is aware of all it flaws and wants to purchase it. What has me interested in selling the anvil is the ability to upgrade (or my perception) to a 300 lb TFS anvil from my local farrier supply store. I guess my thinking is bigger.newer is better. Not a lot of information on the TFS anvils and wondering if this would be an upgrade for general blacksmithing? I do ornamental work, I do not make hammers or anything like that. The largest stock I have worked with so far is 3/4 inch.

Would love to have some folks thoughts on this, should I just stay with the Trenton?

Thanks for listening, Gimpl

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Check the forum for reviews of TFS anvils. I'm not a big fan of ductile iron anvils, but others may have different experiences.

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About two years ago I was doing some research on available new anvils, for sale. 

I came across the Texas Farrier Supply  (T.F.S.),  company's advertisements and  posted information.

It tool me a long time to discover that their anvils were made from malleablized cast iron,  ( = ductile iron ). IIRC they did not come out and explicitly 'say' so in the advertisement's copy.

The written copy artfully avoided mentioning that fact.

I am NOT intimating that the T.F.S. anvil's are inferior. I do not know not know.

But I moved on to competitor's copy.

SLAG.

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For the money you could probably find yourself a nice old one again that hasn't been messed with like yours was.  You don't need a 200 # or even a 300# anvil to do good shop work.  I have 179 # Trenton that does everything with a 160 # Fisher as a second anvil.  Maybe your plan should be to look for 150# - 180# anvil and use the money from the sale to get a decent one in that range.  Just a thought.  Or maybe look for a used new one so you aren't paying the top price.  Just another thought.  Deals are out there if you look really, really hard.  

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I don't know what your farrier supplier is charging, but I see that TFS has the 300 lb blacksmith's anvil listed on their website for $1,432. If memory serves, Holland Anvil (IFI member "foundryguy") has a 190 lb anvil for a couple hundred less than that (plus shipping). The price-per-pound is a lot more, but you're getting H13 tool steel rather than ductile iron. 

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JHCC, you are making me drool....

I am lucky that I have a Soderfors - the best anvil ever made.....

Just ask Frosty!

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Good Morning Gimp,

A bird in the Hand, is worth more than all the rest in the Bush. Get used to and comfortable with the Anvil you have. It will out live you!!

edited to fit a family forum

Neil

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If you do find an older anvil you like PLEASE don't mill or grind the face, you're only shortening its useful life. Flat, smooth isn't really very desirable and sharp edges are not your friends.

I work larger stock >1.25" on my 125 lb. Soderfors, the 200 lb. Trenton is my back up anvil. There isn't much noticeable difference in performance moving steel until we go with strikers and sledges, then the Trenton doesn't move as much. Neither bounces, steel tripod stands. They will walk on concrete a floor. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Thank you everyone. I am down to keeping the Trenton or selling and buying a new Ridgid #9 165lb anvil. Would the Ridgid be a good option? I have found one new delivered to my house for 1169.00.

Thanks, Gimpl

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Find someone close to you that has one and try it out.

Generally, you don't buy clothing or footwear without trying them on. What makes you think an Anvil is different.

Neil

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I suppose you want to get rid of the Trenton because it has been milled, however the rebound you describe is pretty darn good. I have a friend that

had a nice truck that someone scratched when opening a car door next to it, my friend was so upset he sold the truck. I'm not sure that made sense or that you wanting to get rid of the Trenton makes sense. You could use that anvil for many years, probably the rest of your life with no problems.  I would suggest you just quit over thinking your anvil's problem and start using it. You have to ask yourself are you so good of a blacksmith that you can only use a perfect anvil? There are hundred, perhaps thousands of folks on this website that are using much less than perfect anvils and are making a good living.

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On 1/12/2019 at 3:54 PM, Gimpl said:

Would the Ridgid be a good option?

Yes, no, maybe Ridgid has had some hardness problems. https://www.iforgeiron.com/topic/60686-should-dropping-a-1-ball-bearing-leave-small-depressions-on-my-new-anvil/

Sounds to me like you just want a new anvil, so go for it if it makes you happy. The two Ridgid anvils I have worked on were fine anvils.

 

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It is possible to build up a face; we had an anvil repair day held at the smithy of a fellow who is a terrific smith---does demos around the country and a great welder---teaches welding at the college.  A friend of mine had *paid* to have the face of his anvil milled BEFORE he knew anything about anvils or blacksmithing. What was left was too thin and too soft and so he carried it around 20 years not using it until we had that repair day. Thorough preheat; then 5-6 hours of welding by a professional using industrial equipment and lots of consumables (and the Gunther-Schuler anvil repair method!) Slow cool while my anvil was worked on and My Friend could FINALLY use the anvil he had bought so many years ago.

I shudder to think what the cost of such work by such a knowledgeable professional would cost commercially. (Most welders don't know squat about how anvils are made and so can mess them up inadvertently.)

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What is the Trenton anvil not able to do for you that you can accomplish with a new Rigid anvil? 

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Thank you Everyone for your input. What I have learned is that I am spending way to much time on the what if scenario instead of enjoying the anvil. I am going to keep this one and use it plain and simple. If I have issues down the road then I will deal with them but I am sure it will be fine.

Appreciate everyone putting up with my questions. Seems like I have spent more time trying to upgrade my equipment than actually forging and making things.

All the Best, Gimpl

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