Bean07

First solid fuel forge fab.

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Start of today got two reply's about welding brake drums, Ive done lot of types of steels and alloys over forty years so I thought stuff that too hit and miss for me ,so bought some 200 x 12 flat and got this far in about 5 hours this afternoon, now my question to carry on is what is the best depth? it,s about 240mm square inside at top, I can change to what is best recommended it is at 170mm deep at the moment but reducing it will be easy as required thanks all.

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500

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Did you mention which solid fuel you would be using in it as that has a lot to do with depth needed?

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How deep is the firepot?

Where is the sweet spot of the fire?  How are you going to get metal into that sweet spot?

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Nice firepot, 12mm (1/2") thick? wow, good one.

Now the dimensions seem a bit too deep for coal. at least 50mm too deep. I believe it may be just right for charcoal ... but don't quote me. I never worked with charcoal. 

Have a look at this dimensions  www.blksmth.com/mild_steel_firepot.htm

As far as your forge table, I don't think you need such high edges. They are not wrong and will keep the fuel on the table, but you will struggle to heat up longer material. You can remove part of the edge on each side of the firepot so that you can have the steel bar low against the table sticking out past the edge on each side and so inside the fire. Some people make their forge without any edges at all. 

A forge made with such high borders would be OK if you fill it with clay upt to one inch of the edge and mold the firepot in the clay with no steel at all. A cast steel grill from a plumbers supply and you can blow air through it at your heart's content. 

With that nice thick firepot, once you decide the depth you want, don't forget to make a good clinker breaker. Makes life easier. :)

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The last pic is where its just about to be cut out Glen so 60mm lowered too ?? so Marc1 your saying 110mm deep OK will be done thanks.

I take on board what you all have said so end result is no lower than 4 1/2" correct,  bullet grate Charles ? 

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My inner ocd petulant child wants to poke fun and say that the plate in the bottom isn't level ... but that would just be silly. Looks good so far!

I'm sure it will be said by the more experienced solid file guys but you may want to think about cutting out a section at the back incase you need the heat the middle of a long section of stock.

Are you going to be fabing a clunker breaker? Also what is your air supply?

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22 hours ago, VainEnd84 said:

the back in case you need the heat the middle of a long section of stock. Are you going to be fabing a clunker breaker? Also what is your air supply?

First yes im putting in a horizontal door for that so I can do longer stock, and the plate in is only for show of the height, it will be 12mm thick and im not sure  about holes for or slots in it so far.

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Will be that then thanks much appreciated, to all that critique and teach me thank you very much. 

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22 hours ago, VainEnd84 said:

Are you going to be fabing a clunker breaker? Also what is your air supply?

IF that is the base of the firebox, Yes Irondragon Forge & Clay said up to 9mm wide slots are better than holes the block up.

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That base plate is it a permanent fixture or to be replaceable? it,s 12mm thick.

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You may want to fabricate a sliding door (or two) that rides on the top of the forge wall. This way the pass through opening can be adjusted as needed to fit the work you are doing.  Otherwise you may loose a lot of coal out that door and onto the floor.

Make the base plate replaceable. If the original burns out it is now a quick fix by changing it our for a new one. Also you can make a second base plate on legs to raise the bottom of the forge for a shallower fire if needed.  Replaceable base plate makes access to the air tube for removing clogs, clinker, etc real easy.

The ash tube should be rather large (I like 3 inch pipe) so it does not clog up, and rather long so it can hold a quantity of ash before dumping. The T for the incoming air should be close to the bottom of the twyere (3-4 inches) so ash can not fill up and block incoming air to the forge.

Waiting on a report from the first fire.

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wow that is some forge, and if you line it with mud made from termite hills it should outlast your grandkidsB), you might also be able to source one of those old cast iron gully grids to use in lieu of that awesome grid that you made and they last forever.

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7 hours ago, Glenn said:

You may want to fabricate a sliding door (or two) that rides on the top of the forge wall. 

Make the base plate replaceable. If the original burns out it is now a quick fix by changing it our for a new one. Also you can make a second base plate on legs to raise the bottom of the forge for a shallower fire if needed. 

Thankyou very much ianinsa, anvil & Glenn, thanks Glen that was a question I wanted to know, that is it may be sacrificial  that plate, so would you suggest then I also raise it up  from its present position before I make a narrow ring around as a seat for?

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I'm of the belief that *everything* in a blacksmith's shop is a consumable; some however may take a century or  three to wear out!

Note the smith can wear out much sooner from abusive work practices.

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On 1/4/2019 at 8:20 PM, Glenn said:

 

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Not trying to hijack the thread, just a quick question.

 

Does the positioning apply to anthracite coal as well? Might explain how I burnt up one side of the tongs I was trying to make yesterday.

Really hot really fast. Poof, gone, melted in half. Less than a minute.

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The sweet spot of the fire is 1/2 to 2/3 up the height of the fireball. This allows the fuel to burn creating heat and using up the oxygen in the fire. That heat is what you want to warm, heat up, the metal. 

If you put the metal in at a down angle, the incoming air can actually cool the metal and create scale.

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