PJMilo

Help identify Unknown Anvil

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Let me know if this is not the right place. Trying to identify this anvil that was my wifes grandpa's 

Thanks,

Peter

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Thank you for the response. I read through the posted link. My location is Washington. This anvil was probably purchased between 60-80. 

I there isnt any info I could find. Anvilfire which a lot of forums recommended is down as well is another popular site. I figures if I could figure out the maker then I can deep dive into them, but havent had much luck with the symbol.

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No matter what brand name ends up with the anvil, or if there is no brand name for the anvil, the anvil will not change. Only your perception will change.

If you clean up any rust with a wire brush and then apply a protective coating of your choice, the anvil will look cared for. To shine the face, use hot metal under a hammer. Use the anvil for a year (2000 hours) and get personally squinted with each other.

Learn the lessons the anvil can teach, such as how to use the anvil as a measuring device. Figure out all the distances that are available, such as width of the face, the length of the anvil horn to heel, the hardie hole to the step, the length of the horn, the length and width of the base, etc. Write this down at first until you remember them without thinking. Then make your projects to fit these measurements. Learn how to forge weld and how to make chain links, and then chain.  Learn how to make scrolls and curves, how to make half on and half off hammer blows, circles and rings. Then do a little research and find other things the anvil is capable of doing, with your help.

The brand name of the anvil is not important if you allow the anvil to make YOU a better blacksmith.

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From the looks of the numbers on the foot (weight & partial serial number), my guess would be a Trenton. In the picture with the horn to the right it might be the Trenton diamond (very faint). You might be able to bring it out better with the wire wheel and a close up picture.

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Like Irondragon said. Wire wheel and look in this area for any logo stamping. Also a picture of the bottom of the anvil may be helpful. 

Some of the markings shown look suspect to possibly not being from the manufacturer. 

 

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Merry Christmas PJ,

You are in the heart of NWBA country. North West Blacksmith Association. Check out their website www.blacksmith.org  There will be a member near you that can answer your questions. They have use of one of the buildings at Longview Fairgrounds. They generally have a get together near the end of every month. The Spring Conference in May is the event worth going to. Lots of people with tons of knowledge and not one with a chip on their shoulder. Ask anyone a question and be prepared to learn or to be introduced to someone who can answer your question. Demonstrators, Teaching, New and Used Tools and Equipment. Camping is available on site. Hope to see you there.

Happy New Year,

Neil

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Please show a picture of the bottom of the anvil.

They symbol is most likely added by a previous owner and may have been their trademark/stamp.

 

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Thank you for the response. I read through the posted link. My location is Washington. This anvil was probably purchased between 60-80. 

I there isnt any info I could find. Anvilfire which a lot of forums recommended is down as well is another popular site. I figures if I could figure out the maker then I can deep dive into them, but havent had much luck with the symbol.

Edit: Thank you for all the replies. It was great information!

Peter

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I must align with Glenn's approach to the ubiquitous anvil identity infatuation. 

When it is natural for someone to want to know what he has purchased, clearly ... unless you have vast experience and own a few different brands and can compare them, the make and the year of manufacture of your anvil is and will remain irrelevant to what you produce as a blacksmith. 

The first 10 or so years of my blacksmith experience, were spent in the boss workshop using his anvils. "Mine" was an (eastern europe ?) no brand and the boss had a Swedish anvil 80 Kg if memory serves me right. I can assure you it did not matter to me one bit and in fact I had no interest whatsoever in what was written on the side of this anvils, or any other anvil. I liked the boss anvil better because the face was polished mirror like from work. Mine not so much ... I wonder why :) 

The only thing that matters when it comes to anvils is what one can do on them. I prefer larger anvils because the smaller one tend to walk away from me due to the nature of my work. If I made mainly gate locks or smaller stuff, I would love my smaller anvils better.

That is all that matters really, the rest is ... "Carton pintado" ... like the Spanish like to say ... or if you prefer French ... "Pour la Galerie" :P

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