BartW

What can you make from huge drills & reamers ?

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Hello Guys;

 

 

Some time ago I found these in the trashbin of a large company. I've attached a picture. All of the toys are brand new - some are even in the plastic sleeve they get sold in- even tough they have some rust, like on the wrenching bar. each bucket is about 30 kilo (60 pounds). The three largest reamers are 5 kg each :D

The brands are "cleveland" and "Dormer" for the drills; a couple reamers are marked "Dormer" as well; most reamers hawever have no markings except their size.

Now I have 3 questions.

1. The large reamers (65, 50 and 40 mm) don't look like HSS. The mill-scale is all wrong (large spotty); the colour is too black, and the socket end files easier than solf-annealed HSS. Anyone know what steel they are ?

2. The bucket of drills are almost all in the 24mm to 36 mm range, all mk4 socket. But a couple have hardly any spiral, while some have almost 3 whole rounds... anyone know why they use these almost straight drills ?

3. Can these be forged or turned (in a lathe) into usefull tools ? 

greetz; bart

boren-ruimers.jpg

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I dunno, but my initial thought is that they can be used for drilling and reaming. If you can't use them for the purpose for which they were intended, you might be able to sell them to someone who can, take the cash and buy steel that fits your needs. If they truly are 'bin bait' beyond any other use, just start experimenting with them. You might be able to find info directly from the mfg, or an industrial distributor.

Steve

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I'd offer to trade them to amateur machinists for useful smithing stock like S7 or H13!

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Is there anyone who can use things like this ? anyone up for a trade ? :D

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They said it better than I can:  "Low spiral (low twist rate or "elongated flute") drill bits are used in cutting applications where high cutting speeds are traditionally used, and where the material has a tendency to gall on the bit or otherwise clog the hole, such as aluminum or copper."

They also make variable flute these days with a standard twist (and cutting edge) for about 1 spiral and less for the rest--it ejects long-stringy or packed chips better on deep holes because the path out of the drill through the flutes is straighter.  

As others have said, you might poke around to see if there is a machinist who can use them--Drill bits are usually re-sharpenable to be almost as good as new.  Reamers can be resharpened but that's not always cost effective these days as precision on those is critical.  MK4 appears to be the same as a # 4 morse taper and that's really common on lathes...so certainly they have current use to someone.  If those were local (and imperial sizes), I'd probably be on them if the price was right---I use larger drill bits and reamers like those all the time for my work.  

The holder will make a great twister for square/rectangular bar.  

 

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On 12/10/2018 at 3:07 PM, Kozzy said:

 "Low spiral"....... "MK4 appears to be the same as a # 4 Morse Taper"

Very well said, Mr. Kozzy.  And my research indicates that you are correct that MT4 & MK4 are identical and interchangeable tapers. Often, Metric sizes do not bother us in the larger Ø's ....... they are like the "Letter Drill" of large Ø drills.  Hoping the OP has found someone who can take good advantage of these lovely tools......

Robert Taylor

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Those drill bits are worth a lot of money.

I would be highly interested if you were in the US.

The reamers, not so much, one reamer should never touch another.

If you put a file to the taper ends of the drill bits you would find them soft as well. 

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Well I don't particularly mind overseas trades.  Anyone intrested ?

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