Sign in to follow this  
lyuv

My labor intensive letter opener

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

I was asking and whining here about issues I had with a WI san-mai (thanks guys). Here is the conclusion:

First mistake (and chalange) was having a 30mm stack, with only 4mm core. That's only 13% of the billt's thickness.blocks.jpg.b381c479c267e367697856cc1943cf4d.jpg

stack-1.thumb.jpg.c0b95247503666e0f9cb45fc77716165.jpg

The 6cm billet was strechet out to 23cm, so the core was reduced to only 0.8mm. It was a great chalange, and probably lots of luck, to keep the core centered all along the edge.

Through the proccess, the core lost most of it's carbon to carbon migration. To the point it would not harden. So I was left with a nice looking KSO.

Next time - thicker core and nickel liner. Will appreciate any input or comment

sideA.thumb.jpg.db33c28df6d6a8bacf0a83224af43580.jpgsideB.thumb.jpg.b67eca598b6f351de1b427389cbf096a.jpg

(Sorry. I"m a lousy photographer too)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm surprised there appears to be a damascus patterning going on in the first half of the blade with only three layers. You can definitely see the core, it's a shame it did not retain enough carbon to harden properly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's the grain pattern of the wrought iron showing up nicely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Particularly if you are using busheled wrought iron you can get a lot of patterning in it.  I find it amusing that every culture I have seen that used the bloomery method of making wrought iron also came up with pattern welding...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was a method of recycling wrought iron scrap, (or steel), often small pieces that could be collected in a bushel basket. Generally there was a stated limit on how much steel could be in the wrought iron scrap "accidentally".  The term was also used for larger pieces of Wrought Iron being recycled by welding into a solid chunk from scrap.

However the smaller pieces makes for a more interesting pattern.

Colloquially: forge welding up scrap to make a larger piece to use. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, lyuv said:

30mm stack, with only 4mm core. That's only 13% of the billt's thickness.

which translates to having only 13% of the carbon remaining after normal migration

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this