Glenn

Storing an anvil so it does not rust

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What are your suggestions for storing an anvil so it does not develop rust on the face and body? For the discussion lets say the storage is outside in a shed or barn.  The storage time may be months or years.

 

 

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Clean anvil with a cleaner that will remove all the dirt and oil without a residue. The liberally spray with CRC SP-400. Put wherever; check every 6 mo. or so. 

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I'd give the whole thing a good coating of oil, and drape some oil-dampened rags over the face and horn for extra protection. I can't imagine the anvil would rust anytime soon after that.

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Oil damped rags would be the worst choice. Oil rags can self-combust causing fire. Irondragon's suggestion of cosmoline or an equivalent would be best.

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I've only ever heard of spontaneous fires being caused by highly unsaturated oils such as linseed oil. I guess I should have specified that I meant motor oil, which I do not believe to be able to self-combust. (correct me if I am wrong though)

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Any oil in a rag given the right conditions can oxidise, increase it's temperature and burn. 

Wrapping an anvil in oily rags is unlikely to be the right condition for combustion, yet most likely the most unsightly and inefficient way to protect the poor anvil from rust. 

There are dozens of commercial products used in the automotive parts and machinery storage called "temporary rust prevention spray" or words to that effect. All of them attempt to place a temporary barrier film between the atmospheric oxygen and the steel. 

Having said that, it begs the question why not paint. After all, anvil manufacturers paint the anvil all around save the face and cone ... actually seen new anvils with the cone painted.

The face would stay rust free with a generous coat of automotive grease and the lot covered with a canvas tight around the waist. One of my anvils lives under a roof with no walls and all I do for rust prevention is throw a canvas over it and hold it in place with a bungee cord strap down thingy. 

No rust ... and the same goes for the vice. 

 

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I stand corrected then. I always thought that since motor oils are fully saturated oils, the molecules had no place for the oxygen atoms to bond and generate heat. I don't have any formal chemistry education though, so I won't argue. I also don't want to derail this thread any more.

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There are a lot of anvils out there that fall out of use and get stored. The discussion is for a product that is easy to apply that will protect the anvil and leave it in good condition until it is needed again. 

Keep the ideas coming as we are taking notes..

 

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Axle grease, the marine version for example. It will not go away, it may dry out in a few years, but it comes right off with simple solvents.

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Another cheap alternative to industrial products ...  although a touch smelly ... is fish oil. Any hardware store would have some.

We have "White Knight Rust Guard" a rather pompous name for fish oil :)

 

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Time consuming, not sure of price, I get it from work, oops, but Denso Tape could be a long term idea. It works offshore in sea air conditions well. 

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Depending on time, but floor or boot wax is a start. Snow proof has silicon oils in it and works well for boots and retreating oilskins as well. 

Longer turm paint or parifn comes to mind.

on the subject of oil skins, original oil cloth was linen coated with linseed oil. It forms a plastic like film. Linseedboil oil will degrade cotton tho, but soybean oil is also a drying oil (vegtable oil at the market) and won’t. Both oils will yellow as they age. 

I use vegetable oil in my tool handles as it is cheaper and lacks the drying agents in “boiled” linseed oil.

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Good grief, most rust preventatives are more of a problem that the rust, just hit it with a dry rag or wire brush and put it to work. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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For the most part, I agree with Frosty. If you know that you're going to be leaving the anvil alone for any substantial length of time, I'd go with a wipe-down with paste wax or oil, then leave it alone. The problem with rags, covers, or the like is that they may well end up trapping condensation against the anvil.

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Quick coat of cheap spray paint, I use the .99 cent Walmart special flat black. Works great for the moldboards on plows that sit outside all year....

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PAINT?!!! :o 

Flat paint is more porous than gloss.  I didn't believe it when I was told. Then I found out he was a professional painter who specialized in steel preservation. I don't know how long it'd take to make a difference so . . .

Oily rags are a fire hazard, especially in a hot shop.

Frosty The Lucky.

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After the anvil is cleaned, degreased and thoroughly dry I'd use engine paint on it. Costs more but I personally think it holds up better. Could even use the clearcoat one to keep the "cleaned anvil" look. 

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I agree with Das and Marcus, paint the sides and I add, grease the face. 

And more important ... cover with canvas. 

Oh ... I said that already? :P

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why not just paint the whole thing? when you put it back to work a bit of paint remover on the face a couple of minutes with a wire brush on a grinder and bob's your aunt!:D many a goop like fish oil or tectyl  etc. will protect the face but are possibly a mission to remove afterwards and may not smell too aromatic when hot iron is placed on the face in future.

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I have my demo anvil flat engine clearcoated and the face was linseed oiled. Body is still holding up and the linseed oil on top has not been a problem yet. 

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Back in the patch they used to spray the drill pipe sections with "corrosion inhibitor" It will come off with diesel oil I know because they once sprayed a couple thousand feet of pipe Up wind of where our cars were parked when there was a 30 MPH stead wind and a lot of sand in the air. Never having bothered to tell us it was happening on the blank side of the logging unit.

Annoyed us greatly, we "downed tools" and spent the rest of the shift "washing" our vehicles with diesel and then with rig wash.  Didn't greatly affect the old phone van I had, (just more of a matte finish), but my partner with the bright yellow sports car was seriously displeased!

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Nobody has suggested keeping it in the house where it's warm and dry. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Frosty, you are so practical... that's why we like you so much! No mess, no fuss.

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My first thought was storing it in a hard vacuum; but ISS storage rates are so outrageous these days.

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