JHCC

Interesting 2x drive unit

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Saw this interesting drive unit for a 2x? grinder for sale at my local industrial surplus place.  I didn’t buy it (I’m not in the market, since I bought the 2x90), but I’m posting here for reference and discussion. 

B6421255-86A3-4C40-B996-61BDACC3D069.jpeg

The drive wheel is attached to a gear reducer (don’t know the ratio), which is run by a belt and pulleys from a small motor. The motor is only 1/4 hp (which struck me as on the low side) and runs at 1725 rpm.

Would gearing down to a slow speed offset the low power of the motor, especially if it’s set up for one dedicated task (such as running a fine grit or buffing belt)?

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Or is it for grinding/sanding belts at all? Could have run a flat belt to drive something else. 

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Seems odd to set up a V-belt drive to run a gear drive to run a flat-belt drive, but I suppose stranger things happen. 

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Greetings  JHCC,

           That set up is a typical drive system for a method of updating a drill press with flat belt drive to a motorized unit. It also applies to various other small machines .  Great find if you have a use for it. Belt grinder not so much.  

Forge on and make beautiful things 

Jim

 

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Very interesting. Thank you!

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The gear reduction would increase the effective torque of that motor.  I agree with Jim that a drill press would be the most likely application.  

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Yes as Rockstar stated, torque will move as the inverse of RPM (for a given starting HP/Torque input at a given RPM).

Using direct gears, cogs and roller chain, pulleys and belts, whatever: increase point of us RPM, torque will go down by the inverse of the ratio. Slow the RPM at point of use, and torque increases by the inverse of the ratio.

Example: Double point of use RPM (2x1) gives you 1/2 the torque. Halve the point of use RPM (1/2) gives you 2x1 the torque. All this is assuming no frictional losses in the transmission, which is impossible. Different methods of power transfer (pulleys and belts, gear to gear, sprockets with roller chain) all have some frictional power loss, and they are all different from each other.

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