Scott Machalk

New Blacksmith - First Anvil - Trenton 176#

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First of all, this is my first post here so, Hello Everyone!  : )

I'm new to Blacksmithing, but really looking forward to getting started. I have been searching for equipment and scored a few items at a recent estate auction. I didn't' score an anvil there but I ended up with a few post vises, a Buffalo rivet forge, and some miscellaneous stuff.

I ended up selling a couple of the post vises to a really nice guy that offered to sell me one of his anvils. Well, I went out to his place last night and outspent my budget a little but I'm really happy with what I ended up with. This is a 176# Trenton (I believe) I can't discern any markings on the side of the anvil but I'll attack some photos of the serial number (looks like A124616 to me) etc. He thought that this was a 1908 anvil made in Columbus Ohio. Curious what I might find out here.

Thanks in advance!

 

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The "..ENT.." is visible of the Trenton logo.

124k serial is 1914 according to AIA.

That is the 3rd style logo stamp that Trenton used in U.S. Production.

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Your Trenton looks to have a very good face. I hope you have read about not doing any milling, grinding or welding on the hardened face. Hammering hot steel on it will make it shine right up.

BTW: welcome to IFI...

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6 minutes ago, Irondragon Forge & Clay said:

Your Trenton looks to have a very good face. I hope you have read about not doing any milling, grinding or welding on the hardened face. Hammering hot steel on it will make it shine right up.

BTW: welcome to IFI...

Yes, I planned on using it as-is. I picked this one because the face was so nice. Thanks for the heads-up.

I do see a lot of YouTube videos of people repairing anvils by welding them up. Is this type of activity reserved for the really unusable anvils or is it always considered a no-no?

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Many of us lean towards the: First---Do No Harm school of things.

Would you want to have surgery done on you by a surgeon who had just watched it on youtube?

Any video that doesn't talk about the various types of anvils and proper preheat and cool and proper alloy for rod/wire is leading less skilled folks into the possibility of ruining their anvil.  Any video where they think all anvils should have sharp edges is doing the same.

With 37 years smithing; I have seen many anvils damaged from unskilled repairs or milling. I've had repairs done to two anvils; both at anvil repair days put on by ABANA affiliates using PROPER materials and methods.  The Gunther/Schuler method of anvil repair is what I trust.

The other issue is that many people think their anvil needs to be repaired when it doesn't.  Would you automatically rebuild the engine of a used car you buy without even checking if it runs just fine as it is?

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Thomas, thanks for the info. I'm with you on that. An anvil would have to be in pretty rough shape form me to consider trying to repair it. And then I would want someone who knows anvils to do the work. 

Fortunately, this anvil is pretty nice so I don't have to worry about it. Mine has a couple flaws but I think I'll just leave them there. They're earned scars, just like all of mine. : )

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