Ted Ewert

Steel and concrete anvil stand

Recommended Posts

On 11/9/2018 at 4:31 AM, arftist said:

Wrong.

You probably couldn't break your finger hammering on it with your anvil on belly.

 

Whip out that long boring explanation if you are going to make that claim.

It is all about inertia and a 2000 #

block has a lot more than a 200 #.

 

My unceremonious reply is due to your unceremonious post above. Not only it is silly but it is also false. I can guarantee to break anyone's finger laying between two chairs with a 20 lb or a 100 lb anvil on my belly and a 16 oz hammer or if you prefer a 3 lb hammer. 

Like I said, if you think that you can increase the mass of your anvil by having a bigger stand, join the rest of the believers and be happy with that assumption. I am in no way going to add to that. 

The rest of your boring long post that claims all I say is false is very funny, but is devoid of any substance and so merits no reply.  

Better luck next time. 

8 hours ago, arftist said:
8 hours ago, arftist said:

If you wish to be taken seriously then reply in a serious non-pejorative manner.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/8/2018 at 9:31 AM, arftist said:

On topic, yes, concrete has tremendous strength in compression...but small diameter rebar doesn't. 

In no way is this stand designed so that the rebars have compressive strength. 

Sorry, it just isn't.

Another thing about concrete,

It is light, it doesn't make a good filler. 

Use lead to fill pipes for weight,

The combination of 3/4" rebar and concrete gives this stand outstanding compressive strength, an order of magnitude beyond what it needs. The concrete insures there is absolutely no deflection in the rebar, which is it's main weakness in compression. 

Lead is a waste of money. It will dampen the sound, but adds little stiffness to the system. Concrete will also dampen the sound, just as well as lead in this instance, and it adds significant strength and stiffness to the support member. Once the stand is securely bolted down, weight makes no difference. It is only stiffness at that point. 

Contrary to a lot of the armchair quarterbacking going on in this thread, I actually build and test my theories. I know my stand works well because I built and tested it under real working conditions. I would highly recommend this type of stand to anyone who wants a rock solid platform for their anvil. In fact, it worked so well I'm building another one for the new anvil I'm getting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But isn't tension where a concrete anvil stand would give you trouble? It's not crumbling under compression, but from the low-pressure side of the impact curve. In other words, the concrete gives you strength during the blows, and the rebar gives you strength between the blows.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Ted Ewert said:

I would highly recommend this type of stand to anyone who wants a rock solid platform for their anvil. In fact, it worked so well I'm building another one for the new anvil I'm getting.

I have no doubt that your stand will stand for a long time. Consider the relatively pitiful shock you impart at it by hand after most is absorbed by the anvil, compared to the shock concrete in that size can withstand and you are miles ahead. i would have tried fibre reinforced concrete to get a multidirectional reinforcement as an academic exercise, but with the size steel you used, it seems overkill either way.

The only reason folks object to a concrete stand is because it is not done. I would love for you to build a concrete striking anvil with just a thick steel top plate.

Oh no! it will crack! Anathema! :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hopefully this will all work out for you Ted.  Long-term will be the key.  Each year you should report how it is holding up.  If it's doing well, then the naysayers should see that and if it's developing cracks and problems, you should show that as well.  What you are doing really is an experiment and the other half of that is honestly reporting what you find over many years.  You may be onto something or it may be a complete failure in 5 years.  Nobody can tell which it will be at this point.  I'm hoping your design works well over the long haul, but I"ll keep my wooden stump that's worked well for me.  I think folks can miss that aspect,  Your concrete stand might work best for you but not for others just as my plain old wooden stump might not work for you.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/12/2018 at 2:19 PM, JHCC said:

But isn't tension where a concrete anvil stand would give you trouble? It's not crumbling under compression, but from the low-pressure side of the impact curve. In other words, the concrete gives you strength during the blows, and the rebar gives you strength between the blows.

Sure, if he is doing full wind up blows with a 10 # sledge on the side of the horn.

Otherwise, not so much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing that has only lightly been touched upon is the inventiveness of people over time to make their environment better. (Or if it's a common and cheap thing; why are not more people already doing it?)  Had a professor once that told about a fellow getting an advanced degree and his thesis was on the correct height for an ironing board; He experimented with a large number of people all kitted out to measure their metabolism while ironing and came up with the correct height.  My prof when he heard about this sent out a bunch of his grad students to go around town knocking on doors and asking: Do you iron?  If so what height is your ironing board?  The numbers were nearly exactly the same. Also my Father told me about a study they did on telephone bells; they had been using them for 100 years but nobody had checked to see if they were the *best* ones.  That study too indicated that the bells that had been gradually improved for 100 years were spot on with the "properly designed" ones.

Now the big breakthroughs are when you get new materials and apply them to old problems.  So I would like to see experiments with concrete strengthened with the various filaments available now.

Of course you need a decent statistical universe---I see a bunch of horrible anvil stands done by folks who are not smiths and so don't know what they are trying to accomplish save for getting the anvil off the floor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/12/2018 at 9:09 AM, arftist said:

Yes, concrete is very strong in compression BUT rerod only adds strength in tension.

Rebar is used to reinforce concrete in tension mode most of the time. However, it can also be used for compression. As long as it is kept from bending it has as much compressible strength (generally speaking) as any other type of steel. The way I have it configured is to take some of the shock load off the concrete, though I'm not completely convinced it even needs it. It also adds lateral strength when the anvil is struck on the sides. 

BTW, I find the road less traveled a lot more interesting...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now