sharxbyte

My first kitchen knife: Yanagiba (Sushi knife, pic heavy)

Recommended Posts

I'm making a sushi knife for my brother. The steel is mystery, but I believe it was some sort of vintage masonry chisel (1045?) I have extra to practice heat treating on.


The picture with the measure tape is the most recent. I can give more details and will update as I make progress.

38711296_10216939845547364_7323762891516018688_n.jpg

38723427_10216939844947349_483560059935129600_n.jpg

40391316_10217110917784063_6434935000340103168_n.jpg

40400249_10217110918104071_100222808449089536_n.jpg

40407523_10217110920784138_7996869594914488320_n.jpg

40407523_10217110920784138_7996869594914488320_n_2.jpg

42596430_10217335766765147_545099102971494400_o.jpg

42730932_10217335765125106_2133429784863047680_o.jpg

43079502_10217388904733563_7013119808350715904_o.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice job drawing out the chisel.  Looks like you got a lot of length out of it, but I have to be honest, it doesn't look like you have enough width to get a sushi knife out of that to me.  You will have a bunch of grinding to do to get your profile refined enough, and in the shot above the measuring tape there are a ton of hammer marks to grind out (I can't tell if you forged them down in the final photo due to scale).  In any case you will also have to deal with scale removal, warping during heat treatment, and potential decarb from working the billet so long.  If nothing else, I would suggest you make a concerted effort to keep your forge in reduction when you go to heat treat.

If it were me I'd consider making two knives out of this billet, possibly dividing them at the 9" mark.  The section left with the tang would make a nice 6" kitchen knife and the remainder could be sculpted into a lovely little paring knife.

1045 may be a little low in carbon for a good sushi knife (if you chisel is indeed that low in carbon, I would expect at least 60 points).  I think that more typical selections would be for a higher carbon steel that will hold an edge extremely well, but be a little less tough (1095 for example).

Good luck with whatever you decide to do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I started removing scale and realized that this is almost certainly not 1045. It cracks like air hardening steel. so great learning experience at the expense of time and what  may have been a great knife. I have a cold chisel I'll try and if that doesn't work I'll  probably order a billet of the 1095 you suggest.

 

 

I COULD keep working it and see if it breaks during use, or I could make it ornamental, or I can set it aside as a lesson learned. 

Screenshot_20181008-155825_Gallery.jpg

20181008_143717.jpg

20181008_150808.jpg

1539039713783324086591621067621.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, sharxbyte said:

I COULD keep working it and see if it breaks during use, or I could make it ornamental, or I can set it aside as a lesson learned. 

If you're looking for opinions, I'd keep working on it for practice in grinding, putting on the WA handle and then using it to test your heat treating.

I've got a little blade that I did my first twist pattern on and didn't do a good enough job keeping the twists from giving me cold shuts.  It sat on my desk for a couple of years.  I decided to use it to practice my sheath making and started using it hard this past summer during my remodel, cutting everything from insulation to sheetrock, and aside from the cold shut in the blade, it's turned out to be what I consider the perfect knife for this job, and it's become my EDC knife.

 

as always

peace and love

billyO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the input. Yesterday I set it aside and started my first stock removal from a sawblade, but I will revisit the hand forged one and see how it holds up.

20181008_172657.jpg

20181008_180957.jpg

20181008_170937.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now