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I Forge Iron

My first sword build underway


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The heat treat is good, a bit on the hard side but has been tested extensively, including snapping two inches of the tip by driving it into a log and flexing as far as it would take, and I couldnt be happier with the performance. Weight was kept high intentaly to be used for heavy chopping. The next one will be lighter, as i believe a fuller will help greatly.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Nice job!

You've inspired me to consider my first sword build for the summer: A falcata.

It's my favorite classic sword shape, is relatively short, curvy, and single-edged, so I am reducing the number of challenges I am imposing on myself first time out. I will be forging it though. 

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Thank you. I chose to do a stock removal process because it is the fastest way to make a sword, thats the easy part. I know I can forge a sword, what I was most nervous about was the heat treat as I have never done anything that big before and didnt know what to expect. 

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There's nothing wrong with stock removal, doing it well is a LOT harder than forging a preform. Without stock removal it's not a blade it's a black scale covered shape.

Not that I don't like brushed or as forged shapes but it takes stock removal operations to make a blade.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Forging a preform is definitely an easier way to get proper distal taper in a sword blade.  Stock removal blades tend to be overweight as grinding multiple axis tapers evenly by hand is a tough skill and takes time; but forging them in is almost automatic.

A lot depends on what skills and what equipment you have and have trained on.

 

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Of course once you grind the weight down to a better amount; that will have added time to the "modern" method too.

Watch your "traditions" too; remember Moxon published in 1703 "He that will a good edge win; must forge thick and grind thin."

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Ok, by tradition I mean my perfered meathod, forging over a charcoal forge using homemade charcoal. It just so happens I also have access to 5160 bar stock, a burr king grinder, and a free supply of 3M cubitron belts. I couldnt pass up the latter. Forge thick grind thin has always worked for me but I more respect the smith who can forge and finish with a file and stones.

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21 hours ago, 45-70nut said:

I more respect the smith who can forge and finish with a file and stones.

Only if he doesn't complain about not making a decent wage. I have a couple friends who won't have electricity in their shops: forge, file, sand, polish, fit and finish by hand but complain incessantly they can't find a customer who'll pay what all their work is worth. 

There's nothing wrong with hand work it's certainly respectable but it's not necessarily superior, that's a philosophical choice. When I was in school, you passed the class and shop tests for hand work before you had to do the class work and test to touch a power tool. In jr. high metal shop 1 we hand sharpened all the shovels, spades and hoes the agg students used. I can still put a shaving edge on an ax with a draw file very quickly, even if it's been rocked. If it has a blade it's supposed to be sharp. Yes? Ever use a sharp spade? Give it a try sometime. ;)

Frosty The Lucky.

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