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Kerby

Quality of this Trenton?

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I have a couple more in me before I recalculate the value of my time versus the value of my money, lol.

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I gave up on them too; especially one auctioneer where things selling at a bargain "mysteriously" reappeared later in the auction.

I used to bring a book and a camping chair and just sit and read waiting for them to get to me; but I decided I would have more fun forging. This was especially true when the implement/farm auction 2 miles from my shop turned out to be run by the local anvil collector...

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I am an Auctioneer, mostly part time due to seasonal weather in my area. Frosty, I certainly am sorry about your rotten experiences, and offer my sincere apologies on behalf of the honest auctioneers of this world. There sure are some unscrupulous individuals in that industry trying to make a quick buck, like any industry I guess. I run an honest show, if I or my staff intends to bid on anything at a sale, I am bound by Federal statutes to announce that prior to the start of the sale. I inform my staff, that if they bid on items, it is of their own accord for their own purpose, and not to drive prices. I believe in having an honest and good reputation. Once that is gone, there may be nothing left of a man.

Being a state championship bid caller, I have had the opportunity to work for a few guys that ran a crooked show several hundred miles away from me. Everyone in the community knows he takes "schill" bids and drives prices. Good for the seller, bad for the buyer. He has managed to keep the competition out of the area. When he settled up my wages at the end of the day he said, "Wow, you did a really good job, we'll call you again next time we need a hand." I told him, please don't bother, if he runs all his auctions this way. I don't want to be associated with his company in any negative way.

A good reputation takes a lifetime to build, but only a moment to destroy.

Also, I find auctions to be a great place to find many antique tools for Smithing. Sure, someone may have an anvil, but they may also have many other tools that don't get the attention of an anvil, ie: leg vises, post drills, tongs, pedal grinders, forges, blowers, etc. They may have sold the anvil and still have many tools left because no one ever asked about them. Picked up an Edwards No. 5 shear and pedal grinder a little while back. It was a bigger sale, so we ran in 2 rings, (2 auctioneers selling at the same time usually some distance  apart.) The 50 pound anvil was beat up pretty bad and sold at the tool shop. The shear and grinder were to heavy to move and were sold near the barn. It was displayed, but everyone went up the hill to buy the anvil, I was working down by the barn and bought the other tools. The most important tool a Smith has at his disposal is his mind, not the hammer or anvil. Sometimes you have to pass on the anvil to buy something else.

TPAAT works. That little 50# went for $185 beat up as it was. A guy approached me a week later to sell an anvil probably around 100 # for $175. Bought it, brought it home, turns out it's 235# Hay-Budden. Just under 75¢ /lb. 

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