Jasent

Let’s see some fire pokers

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Another observation on the differences between girls and boys:  Boys do sound effects, girls do dialog.  If you give a little boy two rocks he will bang them together saying, "Bang!" "Koosh" "Boom" "Pow" and other suitable sounds.  Give the same two rocks to a little girl and she will have them talking to each other and will come up with an involved backstory for them.

In the 90s a friend was going to raise her son in a nonviolent way with no toy guns or other "violent" toys.  She did her best until one day at breakfast her son, about age 4, bit his toast into the shape of a gun and started "shooting" things in the kitchen with it.  At that point the mother bowed to reality.  The son, now in his late 20s, is an avid Wyoming hunter who puts lots of meat in the freezer every fall.

"Vive la difference!"

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Forged another longhorn poker. I usually forge the puller on the end of the poker on the left at right angles to the bull's head. That gives the poker a right-handed use. With this one I folded the head without lining up the point and it has the tang on the poker end vertical when held.

I could easily have made a twist in the shaft to align it in the usual way, but it seems to be perfectly usable in that position. It only takes a small rotation of the wrist to have the puller on either side.

OK, so what do you guys do? Do your fire pokers have the piece that you fire weld back on the left, right, upright or what?

Sorry about the poor photo. Bit hard to get the depth of field along the poker, but you get the idea.

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Nice job Aus, often the part the item has to play dictates the relationship of motif to handle eye, and also the working end alignment,

Things to take into consideration are

Is it a seperate item,

If it is to be suspended how and where, it could be vertical on a wall, part of a companion set, laid down or on andirons,

All situations have a bearing on the design being used.

To sum up, position is relative to function, make them to suit

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Thanks John and TP. I don't do much commission work … these pokers go straight into the shop and they seem to sell well regardless of the alignment of the working end. I think as a general rule, I will make them like the one in the photo, as a small rotation of the wrist either way makes them function well.

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I had a tendency to "overbuild" things; however I noticed that my wife was preferentially using a very light forge rake to work our wood stove.  (One of those "oops forgot the forge rake *again*!" things made from whatever was to hand just for the one demo and then forever after till the next "oops!")

So I've started making some "gracile" pokers as well as the "robustus" ones...

 

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Magnificent fire set, Alexandr. And good to hear it's coming to Australia!

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On 12/18/2018 at 11:26 AM, ausfire said:

Thanks John and TP. I don't do much commission work … these pokers go straight into the shop and they seem to sell well regardless of the alignment of the working end. I think as a general rule, I will make them like the one in the photo, as a small rotation of the wrist either way makes them function well.

The options are there to discuss with clients who want bespoke/commisioned items , and are things to consider when discussing the clients options.

It's part of the service that sets our products apart from store bought items, they are unique and designed to solve the client's problem/requirements whatever they may be.

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These are the fire pokers I tend to favour, decided to try and film the forging process.

 

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So a few months back I posted about failing trying to forge weld a fire poker. The consensus was that I either over heated it, or I had copper contamination in my forge (or both). I believe the copper has since been cleaned/burnt out of my forge so the other day I gave it another try. This time it worked with 2 things I made sure to do during the process. First, I filed the scale off to bare metal after the initial tapering of the poker end before bending to weld. Also once I started the process I didn't hit it on the side. I think last time my weld may have been weakened by hitting it on the side to even up the joint after it had slipped sideways. I didn't get a full length shot, but here are the 2 ends. The handle side just has a basic loop and reverse twist. The hook end also has a long one direction twist with it being round stock for the middle section, not shown in the photos. I know its not as fancy as others posted in this thread, but it feels good to finally get the weld figured out. Next one I will try to get a bit more fancy on the details.

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Well done...   If metal is the same thickness and you hammer one side more than the other.. One side will be thicker than the other..  

So, just keep this in mind if you are making an item where you want each piece to be even (same thickness) or uneven once side thicker, other side thinner.. 

I like he taper and the hook.. Graceful looking.. 

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How would one forge the longhorn upside down?  It is sort of a big thing here. 

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