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Hello- and, me too, brand of my anvil???


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Hello to all- I have not been near an anvil for 40 + years. Even then, it was small parts for plains style half-stock rifle furniture. I worked in a gunsmith shop for a year before I started practicing law. Learned some shade-tree heat treat and torch welding. When I took up racing later in life I torch welded daily and then to tig for chrome-moly sprint car frames and parts- still stress relieved with torch. I have a mig for rough stuff, sold the big tig and so use torch again- making some handtool parts.

So, except for welding, and some heat-treat I am just a rookie. My anvil has "1 3/4 CW", a place where the name was likely ground off, and below that space, "England"( area about 1 1/2" tall and not quite as wide as the word "England."). On the other side "87 Kg." These are cast in. The anvil rings on the face with just bare knuckles- side of the horn shows grind from cleaning off mold flash. It has never been used. Hardy is 1 1/4" sq.( still needs to have flash filed out) and pritchel is 3/4." It is painted with what I would call "Record blue." This refers to the usual hue of Record handtools and vises. OAL is 27". Face is 4 1/2" wide and 16 1/2" long, then a lower by 3/4" flat face, 3" long and 4 1/2" wide. It is 12" exactly on the height of the face. The horn does not have a significantly dished sweep- main diameter is just over 3 1/2" tapering to 7/16" nose.

Those are about all of the features I can think of to help with ID. I am right in town, so I will be using a Propane forge- right now I am too lazy to mess with wool and cement and finding good jet burners- will likely buy. My father and his father are probably "spinning" - they were both fuel engineers specializing in coal.

I am sure all of you can teach me plenty. Any help on the anvil will be appreciated, though who made it won't change how it will work unless it is from a foundry that casts in defects routinely. I haven't hit it with a hammer yet. Best regards, jet.

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Welcome aboard Jet.

A quick test for your anvil is to bounce a ball bearing off the face. Hold it a foot or so above it and let it drop. If it returns 9-10" it has good rebound and is probably a good anvil.

Don't worry too much about the "ring" some don't have much and are still good tools.

Lastly except as the replacement test for the bearing bounce you really don't want to hit your anvil with a hammer, you want to hit the metal in between.

Frosty

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Brooks had been suggested to me. I did not mention it so anyone's thoughts would be open. I also found Vaughan and it could be one of theirs. My earlier google search for Brooks anvil got nothing. Vaughan does show an anvil with the very same configuration, even the blue paint, and weight is in their range. - I will try again on Brooks. It was a good deal- $2 per pound. Thanks for thinking this quandry over for me.jet

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T'would be even funnier in GBP per pound. I found the connection between Vaughan and Brooks. They appear to now be vending under Vaughan. I am looking at a propane forge from one of the ebay regulars, the two burner knife maker/ general smithing- the guy with the formed, coated liner. Talked to him on the phone- he was a gentleman- told me what he does for his and did not badmouth any of the competition. I found sources for the parts to make my own, but at regular prices for burners and regulators and valves/hose it is hard to match a pre-built."Bob's your uncle!"

I read a selection of posts before registering- I liked that folks here have their opinions, but treat each other with respect- even the arguments were civilized.jet

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I liked that folks here have their opinions, but treat each other with respect- even the arguments were civilized. jet


Thank You.

IForgeIron was built as a blacksmithing resource. Discussions are encouraged in order to exchange blacksmithing information. Opposing views on a topic must remain civil in order to provide and absorb the information presented. Again, thank you for your comments as it confirms the correct decisions were made when setting up the standards for the site.
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racer3j, I just compared your decription with this year's edition of Vaughan's price list. The 1-3/4 Cwt single-bick London pattern anvil that they currently offer matches almost all of your dimensions, excet that the face is listed as 4-1/4 wide and the overall height is 11-1/2. The weight is listed as 88.9K. Oh, and yes it is available in any colour you like so long as it's Record blue ;)

Price, for reasons of interest/curiosity is GBP

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Racer-Welcome to the forum. I wish you had popped up on the radar a little sooner. We just had the spring conference of the Upper Midwest Blacksmith Association this past weekend. We do have smaller monthly meetings in Haverhill, near Marshalltown.

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I will get together with you folks. Among other things, I teach Sharpening Edge Tools for Handtool Woodworkers and will be forging planeirons- some just shaping and heat-treating O1 and some traditional forge welding for typical bench planes-wood bodied and infilled.

On another note, and this is crazy, at the present exchange rate, my anvil would cost over $1200 before any transportation. So, for product alone, I paid $ 1.38 per pound. I am very excited about this. I will be trying blades as well- I have some good high carbon stock. We still have some jobshops here so I need to find one who can laser cut some .250 O1 plate. But, I have so much to learn and re-learn. I sure hope this is good physical therapy for the southpaw torn rotator cuff. More likely force the surgery.

I have some very dry 4 x 4 oak and would like info on building a base- I need to kill the ring. I'll need a wood base and some sandbags- an experienced smith told me today that hanging an item through the pritchel by a "hook" will also help. And, I need a leg(stake) vise. I have to wrap hardened chain around the anvil and weld it into those orange, in ground, eye looped auger stakes. Better make the under ground call . I have a 70 pound Rock Island 5 inch vise- I guess I could weld fab the stake/leg. I am excited out of my mind. I am too old to get this way, but it feels great. I get my SS in June.Thanks and best regards, JET( nickname is "Mike"- if I told you I'd have to k___ all of you)

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Bench vises do not become post vises by welding a leg on. A post vise is designed for folks to pound on it with a sledge hammer---do that to a bench vise and you have pieces and no vise.

Keep looking for a leg vise!

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This is a 100 pound Holland Bench Vise

This is a post vise.

The difference is that the post vise is designed to be hammered upon and transfers the impact down the post (leg) to the ground.
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