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Well i have been outgrowing my HF ASO and found a M&H on craigs list. I havent weighed it but i would say it is at least 100lbs. No pratchet hole. I paid $200. no matter what it is a step up from what i had. I tested the rebound and appeared to be great from my unexperienced eye. 

My question is, do i need to do anything to the anvil prior to using it? And will I regret not having a pritchet hole? The numbers on the anvil is 1.1.10

well, first time posting a pic failed.

20180713_151010.jpg

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Hundredweight 1.1.10 = 150lbs

Looks fine to use as is or wire wheel it and give it a coat of something to keep it nice.( many things have been suggested many times and its mainly personal preference.)

Dont worry about tha lack of a pritchel hole. You can easily make a bolster plate to use on top for that. 

Nice old anvil, it will serve you well. If i remember right the lack of a pritchel hole puts it at pre mid 1830's. 

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Greetings OC,

          It was your lucky day,  A great anvil and worth more than twice what you paid. Now get to work and make something to post on IFI. 

Forge on and make beautiful things 

Jim

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i dont think i need to wire brush. I will research more on the benefits of linseed oil, motor oil, or soot and turpentine.

Thanks, I could post my ugly things so far... but the hammering technique is getting better. Hopefully beautiful things will come soon and be post worthy.

 

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Hot metal will shine the face. The rest of the anvil can be protected by a variety of materials, including paint.

Keep in mind the best way is using the anvil on a regular basis.

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Nice score. Wire brush it to remove the dirt. No don't use motor oil, it stains and is toxic. You want to use boiled linseed oil it will polymerize so it will not remain oily and form a protective finish. Soot and turpentine? Re-read Alex Bealer's, "Art of Blacksmithing," you have the recipe wrong for that finish. The soot is completely unnecessary, that was for the days most most structural iron was wrought not mild steel. I can explain that if you like. You can soften paraffin wax with turpentine to shoe polish consistency and it makes a good finish. Applied to warm steel if penetrates all the nooks and crannies and when the turps evaporate off leaves a nice thin coat of wax. I have stuff hung outside for close to 20 years with that finish and on rust. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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thanks Frosty. I was going from memory but was planning to reread the reference.  

 

I just spoke with the gentleman I purchased this from. Looks like he found a 8inch post vise in one of his storage containers. Looks like I may have another score this weekend that he will let go for $100...wifey is gonna get upset

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An 8” post vise with the screw in good condition for $100 would be a good find indeed. 

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$200 U.S. (1.33 a pound) for a 150 lb. M&H Armitage Mouse Hole anvil in the shape yours appears to be in is an absolute steal. Use it in good health and pass it on to your grand kids and beyond.

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