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Picked this up and wanted to document it here. Weight mark is obscured but it's HEAVY. Measurements are 36" long, 15" tall, and 6" across the face. According to the 1914 Hay Budden catalog, this puts it between the 350 and 400. Anyway, she's a beaut. I think this is a later HB with the cast upper, but i haven't dated it yet. Shot a pic of the logo, the serial #, and a size comparison with a 100# Trenton on top of it.

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Thanks JLP, this is my first HB and I realize I really know very little about the company /construction! I've gotta get AIA soon.
 

I'm pretty stoked MotoMike, this is the biggest anvil I've used yet. I still don't think it's really necessary for most of what I forge, but maybe it'll change my mind once I start using it.

Anyone able to tell me when HB started the two piece construction?

 

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I wanna say 1907 but that is from memory and more than likely wrong..

 

I can tell you that HBs are my favorite old anvils and were the first to make the 2 piece anvils with the solid forged tops..

 

I used a 175lbs daily for 10 years and it was perfect the whole time..

 

Back in the late 80's and 90's most in my area disliked HBs because of how loud they rang.. 

 

Peter Wrights were the favorites...

 

 

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It's bizarre how there are trends in anvil brands. Around here people obsess over PWs... You show them a Mousehole or Trenton or a cast Swede and they go on about how much they've read about PETER WRIGHT.
 

Personally, I just want an anvil that moves metal. This HB is replacing my 178# A&H in the center of the shop.

Thanks again JLP. Love your videos btw.

 

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1908 according to AinA; but that was the year they were experimenting and cutting over so there would probably be some of that year made the old way. However all of the 2 piece anvils post date that period.

Amazing how so many people confuse "most popular" with "best" isn't it?

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ABSOLUTELY.
I'll hold back from the near deranged diatribe about the internet culture. Simply put, there's some value... And allot of garbage. Like a flea market, but less satisfying to sift through

 

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D.C.  thanks for the kind words on the videos..    

Hay Budden actually produced 4 different variations of their anvils.. The early wrought with steel face..   Then a 2 piece of steel with wrought iron feet.. The earlier ones had a larger drop at the cutting table.. the 3rd design had a smaller drop at the table, And then they made a solid 1 piece steel anvil that was die forged.. 

Yours is a 2nd design and is my favorite out of all of them.. I own 2 of the shorter drop or 3rd design but they didn't seem to fair as well, Could be how they were used and I like the taller drop as it makes for a handy area for upsetting bars back into it as well as cutting hinge barrels after welding.. 

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Did the solid steel tops welded on sway like this one?  There seems like a lot of sway on the face based on the pictures.  I thought sway was a distinct characteristic of a steel face welded onto a wrought iron body.  There's also a lot of chisel test marks, makes me wonder if it's one of the early ones during the switch over that Thomas was talking about.  Others with more knowledge can correct me on both points.

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Yes and no.. 

Sway in solid steel anvils is because of really hard use..    Some it can be from erosion of the steel face as well..   Cast steel anvils seemed to have fared a little better in this regards at least in the examples I have seen except a Columbian which had a dent around the Hardie hole showing the type and size outline of the swages they used day in and day out.. 

Steel anvils over all show less damage from heavy use but they still show some.. Also who knows how much heat exposure and anvil has had for a given industry..  I've worked my anvils hot enough that water will boil when applied to the face..   Not on purpose mind you, but it can happen and back when these were used for heavy forging it's a possibe.. 

History and the anvil are the only ones who will ever know.. 

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Anvils for the most part were a tool like any other..  while they would last a lifetime, many smiths were taught to do test cutting with chisels on anvil bodies, and feet.. 

It's not in bad shape..  And it looks to me like they made items that were bent..  Forged and then bent downwards..  Hence all the hammer marks in the side.. 

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Of the 20? Lee's Liquor locations, the one in Mesquite NV does the most revenue, around $8,000,000 a year. 85% of the business is from out of state with Utah (40 miles up the road) being the majority of that. I have talked to customers who said they came down from SLC to visit friends in St George and their friends were telling them You have to go to Lee's! It is like a tourist destination now. I'll admit it is one BIG liquor store.  One kid was taking pictures and when asked about it told the clerk, I'm from Canada, and my friend's aren't going to believe these prices!.  Snowbirds from Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming also come in and stock up before heading back for the summer. One clerk told me he has seen guys drop $10,000 and load the motorhome up. Must be reselling back home.

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I'm guilty of the same thing, anytime I travel south, I hit Lee's if I'm just in Nevada or Costco if I make it to California. Prices in Wyoming are good, but Nevada and Cali definitely cater to the drinking crowd.

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