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I have an old skil or Stihl the name rubbed off thirty years ago. My step dad gave it to me when I turned twelve. He bought it in about 1982 or so and I got it about 1987. I've changed the brushes a few times and it still runs like new. It's a nine inch one. I've been looking for another one for years and haven't seen one.  He had Milwaukee power tools also. I'll have to check for a metal badge to make sure of the manufacturer.

Pnut

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On 7/27/2019 at 5:51 PM, setlab said:

Why does dewalt suck? Never had issues with all mine over the years. 

For me i don't like their  warranty or the way they fit the hands i find them to big and bulky for tight spots thats on the 5'' i'm definitely not a fan of it..For me i like the fit and finish on the Milwaukee when the makita goes i'm goin red..

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I've got a couple of DeWalt angle grinders (bought secondhand), which I've been generally happy with -- with the exception of the 4.5" that stripped its gears.

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Dewalt used to be a high end name but it was bought out and is selling on the name. I have a Dewalt that's been going strong for better than 30 years but the new ones stink big stinky piles of cheap Chinese cheapness. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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I kill em all....I have had makita  and bosh and dewalt give good service but they all die. going for a pro model over a cheapy makes them much nicer to use but they still die! I treat them as a consumable.

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I have  Milwaukee I got from a pawn shop. Love pawn shops for tools

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On 7/27/2019 at 4:02 PM, Steve Sells said:

I bought a 13.2v drill

I'm not allowed to buy any cordless tools. I probably have a dozen drills, saws, grinders and a weed eater that have only lasted less than a year and the batteries will not take a charge after a short life. My wife says I must have reverse polarity that kills the batteries:o and to buy replacement batteries (if you can find them) cost almost as much as a new tool.

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Rechargeable Batteries have memory. If not charged properly they stop charging up all the way.

Pnut

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I picked up two guards for 4" grinders at the scrapyard recently---as they are often missing from used tooling spending a quarter or to to be ready for the next one suits me fine.

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I've got a great dewalt. Been through to heck and back and just won't quit.  One thing I've found to make a major difference in any brand of power tool, it makes a difference where you buy it.  It won't usually change the design of the casing, or how you grip it, but some companies actually use lower grade components in the products they sell through the cheaper box stores. 

And before you bemoan the corruption of the tool companies, it's not entirely their fault.  Some of the companies like walmart threaten to go to their competitors unless they cut prices to the point that they can't turn a profit making them at the same quality, and if they lose that much market share, then they go out of business.

Right now, I'm using a cheap Chicago brand grinder from Harbor Freight. I don't remember if I paid the whole $11 dollars for it, or got it on sale for $9.  My good grinders are down in a storage unit in Georgia, and I keep telling myself that I'll go pick up my tools any day now.  It's clunky and ugly, but unlike most harbor freight grinders, it just keeps on going like the Energizer bunny.

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I bought a four and a half in. Walmart cheapie and for 18 dollars it's nearly disposable. I break out the big heavy as an anchor grinder for anything large but the junk Wal-Mart one I think was worth what I paid for it. I bought it because it's six amps and the rechargable power supply I use at the forge won't power anything larger and I try to stay away from rechargable power tools.

Pnut

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I have a 4 1/2" Ryobi. It's been used hard for two years. It shows no signs of letting up, so it's been worth it. I really didn't think it would last very long. 

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This morning I contacted one of the following and I was told Stanley owns the Dewalt, Irwin, Black & Deckerand Craftsman brands. If you want to know who owns what, turn on the google-fu and do a quick search of the internet. 

 

From the internet:

Stanley Black & Decker Headquarters: New Britain, CT, USA

Construction and DIY (CDIY)

Black & Decker

Bostitch

Dewalt

Porter Cable

Stanley

Irwin (Acquired in 2017)

Lenox (Acquired in 2017)

Craftsman (Acquired in 2017)

 

Industrial

Blackhawk (Proto)

Bost

Britool

Facom

Lista

Mac Tools

Pastorino

Powers

Proto

Sidchrome

USAG

Vidmar

 

Irwin Tool Brands (Sold to Stanley Black & Decker in 2017)

Irwin

Hanson

Marathon

Marples

Quick-Grip

Record (vises)

Speedbor

Strait-Line

Vise-Grip

Unibit

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The Ryobi Tools brand in North America, Europe, Australia and New Zealand is owned by Techtronic Industries of Hong Kong, an original equipment manufacturer for brands such as Craftsman, Milwaukee, AEG (AEG Powertools, licensed from Electrolux), Ryobi, Homelite, Hoover US, Dirt Devil, and Vax.

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Chicago Electric power tools is the house brand for tools manufactured by Harbor Freight Tools discount tool retailer. The Chicago Electric-branded tools are only for sale new from Harbor Freight.

-------------------------------------------

The Ridge Tool Company is an American manufacturing company that makes and distributes hand tools under the Ridgid brand name. The company was founded in 1923 in North Ridgeville, Ohio. In 1943, it relocated to its current location in Elyria, Ohio, and in 1966, it became a wholly owned subsidiary of Emerson Electric.

----------------------------------------------

91 percent of the global power tools market is controlled by just 18 megabrands . Of those, four companies control 48 percent.

--------------------------------------------

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I have a 9 inch grinder that has worked fine for 35 years with nothing but Changing the brushes and blowing out the motor a few times. It's not the most comfortable tool to use but it's definitely a workhorse.

Pnut

 

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