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I Forge Iron

#5 Fly Press, Via Camp Verde, Arizona, USA


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Yes, Jennifer, well said. You are well versed on this process. 

This is currently an exercise in "what I can get away with". I have a beautiful K.O.Lee Aberdeen tool & cutter grinder up in the shop, If I have to get serious. If I were to get seriously serious, I would purchase used OEM top and bottom sets, and refurbish them.

I welcome all scrutiny and critical analysis of my tinkering.......

Robert Taylor

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No Critiquing here.. Just more FYI for those following along.  

There is a difference between knowing what one can get away with (experience or knowledge first hand aka analytical thinking) vs just seen.

I use a punch shaped like the one sided you had shown for a hand punch to cut wrought iron against the grain before punching but many don't understand why. 

I love the pushing of the envelope and understanding. same page now. 

Have you tried a less or greater angle to see how it manipulates the bar and punch slug?  I see the slug has the one sided shear factor. Pretty neat indeed. 

 

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Thanks, Jennifer, the possibilities are endless, really.

I am one of those who has not yet divined a hypothesis for your wrought iron comment. but I hope to come up with something before you share that nugget.:)

That 15º angle is the result of me running past the 40 grit belt over the course of two hours, grind and set aside to cool, repeat. Had I stayed on it, with quenching, I would have been closer to my goal.  Way steeper than I had intended. Ideally, I would want to be around 7º ±2º.

I think that I have use of 50% -75% of the machine's capacity right now, as it is strapped to a 75# industrial wagon, who wants to rotate. I am eager to get the thing mounted onto the ~600# Walker-Turner drill press table.  Till then, I must confess that I might as well be just goofing off (sort of).:rolleyes:

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  • 1 year later...
Posted (edited)

Quite a bit has happened to the flypress since my last post.  Here is a two-bit flower that I roughed out with one of my newest dies:

20210410_201216.jpg

20210409_220322.jpg

20210410_204556.jpg

The picture with the copper disk was a test cut.  Next die will be a single bevel, to make for cleaner lines. This test has inspired the design of the next iteration of dies for this product.

Robert Taylor

Edited by Anachronist58
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  Very nice.  More please.   My grandpa was a tool and die man.  I find it facinating, but never had the time or brain power to pursue it!  I am of the artistic bent....  :)  

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I liked the step where it looked like gingko leaves.

I enjoy finding/using improvised tooling for my screw press; it's just a #2---stands 7' tall and the toroid is over 200 pounds (Every company had their own numbering system...)  I've found the dome headed RR bolts and spherical trailer hitch balls that both fit in my tool holder work well as well as the replaceable ends of rock drills that make a good sized " + ".  I also use it with my dishing forms and my latest a charcoal strainer that fits on top a 5 gallon steel bucket,  made from expanded metal, was done using a large bearing race outer ring and a section of 8" steel round.  

My hot cuts, punches and drifts get a work out too.

 

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Thanks, Nodebt, I was very excited to produce something besides tooling with my tooling... that blade is like a five ton vegematic, Made from bi-metal commercial band saw blade. The upcoming challenge will be when I try to fabricate cookie cutters from this material.  I am practiced in most of the steps:  Forming, grinding, brazing; will have a learning curve on heat treatment.

ThomasPowers said:

"I've found the dome headed RR bolts and spherical trailer hitch balls"...

Yes, I have both of those in my kit.  A bit inconvenient to have to blend out that pesky flat that resides on the top of most trailer balls...  Good tip on the rock drills.  I am basing my quick change tooling on 1"-8 threads, which is working out very well.

Would love to see that 8" die set!   Had to look up ginkgo leaves - those striations were fun to make with a blunt edged die.

Robert Taylor 

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Here is the 1"-8 top adapter for the quick change die:

20200630_190515.jpg

And the nut to receive tooling, with thrust washers to distribute the load to the ram face:

20200630_191229.jpg

Robert Taylor

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The flats are a pain to deal with; that's why I specified spherical trailer hitch balls---the one with no flats.  Not very common; so I pick them up whenever I find them at the scrapyard or fleamarket.  An old armourer's trick was to buy a hitch with a flat, cut the ball off leaving a bit of the stem on it. Flip it over and weld the flat to the remaining stem and grind the little bit of the stem left on the ball to match the curve of the ball.  Too much trouble for me; I just go with ones with no flat...

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