MotoMike

Get a load of my new Grinder

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Though not fully fleshed out yet, I am now getting excited .

forge175.jpg

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Going to one-up me aren't you? :P

Can't wait to see it all together. I've been dealing with Tru-Grit for belts. Very reasonable and really fast shipping. And the ceramics are definitely worth it! I haven't tried the Blaze ceramics yet, but the other ones that they carry are great. I should have gotten more of them.

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thanks for that Shawn.  been eyeballing potential vendors.  One upping you not likely, haven't even forged a knife.   I have a set of course belts coming to help me with the setting up of the machine.  

 

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Not so oppressively hot today, so spent some time in the garage today working on the tracking wheel assembly.

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Thanks Shawn.   going to steel mart tomorrow to nose around their cut offs for the idler wheel plate and platen parts.  

 

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Coming along! Looking forward to the finished project. 

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Got the guide wheel plate, adjustable platen and tool rest built today.  Should be welding it up soon.  

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On ‎6‎/‎28‎/‎2018 at 3:19 AM, Mudman said:

Coming along! Looking forward to the finished project. 

Thanks Mudman, me too.

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Making a knife next week then? :P

That's actually coming along nicely Mike. Can't wait to see it up and running.

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My advice... get 80 grit ceramic belts for your heaviest stock removal work.  Coarser grits are LESS efficient!  

Set up where you can get a good access to a slack belt area... I do about 75 percent of my grinding on my slack belt space.  

The addition of a high quality buffer has made my work much simpler and superior in quality.

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Bigfoot,

Respectfully disagree with almost all of your post.  Slack belt grinding is particularly inefficient as compared to grinding on a platten, if efficiency is your first goal.  Also, it is only useful for grinding convex shapes, so unless you are only grinding convex crossection blades (for example) you can't get where you need, and the lack of a platen to push against means you can't take good advantage of ceramic belts (which remove more material per belt lifespan in my experience).  In addition, with a spring or hydraulic tensioning system, belt tracking can become an issue for slack belt grinding as can damage to belt edges.

As regards grit, by all means start with 60 or 80 grit as your first pass until you get familiar with grinding on a 2 x 72.  Once you have things under control, 36 grit will definitely remove more material faster than a higher grit.  Of course it also allows you to make mistakes faster, so I personally still tend to use 60 grit as a starting point.

I suspect I don't have a "high quality buffer" setup at this point (I think, though I'm not completely sure what qualifies a buffer as high quality).  In my experience a buffer is only used as a last pass on finishing and is only an improvement in quality if you are looking for a true mirror finish.  For me, if I botch an earlier step (don't remove all 200 grit scratches when switching to 400 for example) the buffer will only hide it from a quick viewing.  Probably need a better buffer...

My suggestion is to look at Trizact structured adhesive belts for grits over 250 after you get up and running for a while.  They seem to be a little resilient which works wonders for me.  Expensive though.

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36 grit running on a 10" dia serrated contact wheel will remove "stuff" scarily fast---including flesh and bone! You can go from "OOPS" to "AMBULANCE!" in fractions of a second!

36 grit running on a 10" dia serrated contact wheel will remove "stuff" scarily fast---including flesh and bone! You can go from "OOPS" to "AMBULANCE!" in fractions of a second!

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6 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

36 grit running on a 10" dia serrated contact wheel will remove "stuff" scarily fast---including flesh and bone! You can go from "OOPS" to "AMBULANCE!" in fractions of a second!

I'll have to agree with this. I use a 36 grit wheel when I'm in a rush, or looking to remove steel fast. Nortan Blaze belts are nothing short of terrifying. On really really hard woods that are also stabilized, it's really quick. It also helps you screw up faster too. 

For everyday removal (more or less) I've really started to like the Cubitron II 60+ belts. 

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Larger grits do remove stock and flesh much quicker than smaller grits i swiched from 36 grit blaze belts to 50 grit as a starting point as many of you have said it is eaiser to mess up quickly too. 50 seemes to be a nice comprimise between fast and controlable. 

Blaze belts are awesome but i really need to try other brands

high quality buffet = 2x 72 cork belts from tru grit + some buffing compound best polishing media i have ever used 

Linnen buff works as that final step 

leather belts are nice too as it is quick to power strope 10 knives on tge grinder than doing it all by hand 

enjoy

 

du

 

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Got it tacked down and squared.  Mocked it up just to gander at it.  I know my welding leaves room for improvement. 

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She's running!  took a while to get the tracking set, but now it seems to be doing well.  this is just to show it running.  I have the platen too far from the belt in this shot.  Now disassembled for painting.  

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Hmm... much to consider in Latticino’s post!  I find most of it in complete disagreement with my own experiences though.  

Let’s start with slack belt work.  I vastly prefer slightly convex grinds to other types!  I control the degree of convexity with pretty good precision by adjusting the pressure which I apply.  My viewpoint is... “why grind a secondary or micro bevel, when I can do it all at once and have a smootherblade that slices more effectively?”.  I do have a 10” contact wheel which is always available if I move off the slack belt area.  I use this for heavy removal work but move to my slack belt for refining edges.  BTW I usually use a bit more acute angle for my edges which allows the slightly convex bevels to present just the optimal angle right at the cutting edges!

Now as to my buffer.  I use my buffer as an integral part of my sharpening sequence.  I remove the wire edges with my buffer and also polish the edges just enough... just enough to make them sharper and longer lasting than any other type of edge finish that I have tried!  The one exception is to polish the edges with polishing stones to a mirrored surface.  This takes days or even weeks... but the results are stunning!  My buffed edges are very nearly as good with mere minutes invested!  

Because of the lower number of cutting edges, I find that for blade grinding, any grits beyond about 50 or 60 grit will actually slow my work significantly.  If you do lots of grinding on annealed stock or mild steels you’ll find more use for coarser grits.  All the work that coarser grits would do for me... I achieve by forging!  

I am really confident of this advice and use it regularly myself.  If you disagree, well do it your own way... but here is gold if you want to pick it up!

Joy of the forge to all of you!  I’d buy a round if we were close enough!

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I can now say it is finished.  Almost.  still must affix a signature handle on the tracking pillar to compress the tension spring.  But other than that, she's a runner.  the tracking pillar does not fit the support tube tightly, so right now it has some plastic shims coated with graphite to keep it square.  might do something to make that a more permanent and precise tolerance.  Other than that it works fine.  Already second guessing my choice of black as it really seems to collect the dust.   Oh yeah, I still need to put the static draining brush on it.  

 

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