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Chiefum

need help

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Would anyone know of a place I could but good knife making steel in Cincinnati Ohio? 1080 or 1095? I may settle on 01 tool steel but I'm trying to make my first actual knife and I would like to use something with a decent amount of carbon.

I've looked all over but can't seem to find anything but 01 tool steel around here. I'm basically just trying to save on shipping costs.

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6 hours ago, Chiefum said:

 I may settle on 01 tool steel but I'm trying to make my first actual knife and I would like to use something with a decent amount of carbon.

why do you think O1 doesnt have a decent amount of carbon?

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I've bought parts from Oregon Blade Makers for my belt grinder.  I only ordered wheels for one grinder, so small is ok. 

Honeck engraving makes touch marks.  I just ordered one from Yvonne.  They are in Milwaukee. They are very easy to work with and have made lots of marks for smiths stamping hot metal.  

 

 

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3 hours ago, Steve Sells said:

why do you think O1 doesnt have a decent amount of carbon?

Well I'm just new and I've read a lot of random stuff online. I thought 1095 has more carbon than 01 and makes for better edge retention. Alos I hear O1 rusts a lot easier and shouldn't even be stored in a leather sheath or it'll rust. Though that's just what I've read online while trying to do my own research.

3 hours ago, Charles R. Stevens said:

A custom spring shop will have drops of known steel in the 60 point range. This will get you into the R50-60 range. 

I'll have to make some phone calls on this then. Thanks!

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O1 requires oil to quench 1” sections because of its high carbon content, W1 can use water to quench 1” sections because it has a lower carbon content. With thin sections like knives O1 may very well air quench and dang sure will quench on a chill plate (anvil). One must use oil to quench W1 in thin sections as well. 

As to rust, plane carbon steels will all rust, stainless steels will to, just much slower do to the amount of chromium and/or nickel in them. Note they are generally wear resistant (harder to sharpen and stays sharp longer) but usualy require specialized heat treatment. 

I wouldn’t take much stock in what one reads “all over the internet”. Tho I am not on any of the knife chat sites I know from experience that here we have expert knit makers here, including authors and even a metallurgist and no bad information or advice will stand for long. IFI is in effect an interactive pier reveiwed document.  

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Nice, in that case, I'll probably pick up some o1 here this weekend and see what it's like. I really appreciate the responses and information.

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Note, knives are much thinner than one inch bars that the typical heat treat is quoted for, you may very well have problems with O1 steel cracking on the quench, if it doesn’t temper it right away as it can crack setting on the bench.  

Don't use ATF or engine oil (especially used) use vegetable oil (used is ok if you don’t mind the smell of fries, chicken or fish)or formulated quenchant, and folks like Steve Sells generally recommend warming it up some.

Seriously take some time reading about forging and heat treating High carbon steels in the knife section, especially the nice making 101 series, it will save you much frustration. 

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19 hours ago, Charles R. Stevens said:

Useless quotes removed

I'll get on that right now actually. I appreciate it!

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So I've looked through the list of sanding belt suppliers here and it doesn't seem like anyone has the full list of 2x72 belts I'm looking for. I want to buy my 40, 120, 220, 400, and 800 grit ceramic belts in one place and I was looking for belts that are decent quality even if they cost a little more. Do I have to bounce around and buy my belts from different sites?

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If tru grit doesnt stock them, then no one will. I buy mostly form USA knifemaker, but I dont know of anyone that makes ceramic 400 or 800 grit.

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On 6/14/2018 at 3:33 PM, Chiefum said:

I may settle on 01 tool steel but I'm trying to make my first actual knife

O1 can make good blades, but it's usually not recommended as a starting steel.  The forging range is narrower than plain carbon steels, and some of the contact or air quenching issues have already been mentioned.  Other steels such as 5160 and 1084 are more tolerant of beginner mistakes in forging temperatures and quenching.  Whatever you choose good luck and show us the results when you get a chance.

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10 minutes ago, Steve Sells said:

If tru grit doesnt stock them, then no one will. I buy mostly form USA knifemaker, but I dont know of anyone that makes ceramic 400 or 800 grit.

Ok, so normal belts for 400 and 800 should do fine then I guess.

I'm having issues figuring out some of the grits on some belt brands. I don't see anywhere that just out right says the grit. 

For example Norton Ceramic SG R981... Does the 981 mean it's basically a 1000 grit belt? I'm pretty confused on what I'm looking for here when it doesn't out right say the grit. Not to mention I'm basically guessing on brands as well. I thought Norton would be a good brand but it doesn't look like they make many ceramic belts or at least these sites don't carry them.

This is probably more annoying than shopping for metal stock near me haha.

 

Also thanks for all the help so far Steve. I know it must be annoying answering all my stupid newbie questions.

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4 minutes ago, Buzzkill said:

O1 can make good blades, but it's usually not recommended as a starting steel.  The forging range is narrower than plain carbon steels, and some of the contact or air quenching issues have already been mentioned.  Other steels such as 5160 and 1084 are more tolerant of beginner mistakes in forging temperatures and quenching.  Whatever you choose good luck and show us the results when you get a chance.

I'll see what I can find near me for 5160 and 1084. It seems like no matter how hard I look there isn't anyone around me that sells anything besides O1 that I can use. Thanks for the tip on trying out the 5160 and 1084, hopefully I can find them!

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13 minutes ago, Chiefum said:

Also thanks for all the help so far Steve. I know it must be annoying answering all my stupid newbie questions.

Since the web sites list the grit then the name and type . its hard to understand how you dont know the grit.  Also Norton R981 is the type not the grit

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https://trugrit.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=198_1_145_146&zenid=a11cf0d5a8be585d4bc5b66f5b037cf8

or  https://usaknifemaker.com/shop-categories/abrasives/belts.html

scroll through the pages its all there, you are making this too hard

on second link, click on an item and get the grit selections

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Note:  I generally buy my higher alloy steels at Quad-State in Troy Ohio in late September.  Usually a bunch of folks selling them including several knifemaker supply companies; I've also seen the NJ Steel Baron at Quad-State selling before.  Start saving your pennies to attend and camping out onsite is usually a great way to save money and meet people!

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