Fuzzy K

I can be a Swordsmith

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Sorry I am 13 and I am gonna disagree with you guys so please don't kick me out. But I just started last year and I only really make knifes so I am probably the most inept blacksmith ever but I also made a sword it is just a wall hanger and I learned a lot. I think that you can make as many knifes and swords as you want as long as you dont want to do more than cut paper.

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If it can't be used as a sword; it's not a sword.  SLOs or wall hangers very much in the "this is not a pipe" manner.

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Well its sharp and you can cut stuff and it looks like a sword. I use it as a wall hanger but I think you could count it as a sword.(its a little tough but I sure learned a lot)

15283440132335581537876947352067.jpg

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Kudos to Fuzzy age 13 for his attempt at making something. :)

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weight? 

And do you know about draw filing?  Swords were generally the weapons of higher status people especially in earlier times and so generally showed a lot of care in fit and finish. (You had to be able to afford the time to learn and practice using them; so folks dedicated to the production of food and clothing were generally not able to spare the time.) Peasant levies were generally armed with spears, axes, bows.

Standing armies (think Rome) had professional soldiers that might be outfitted with swords.

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1 hour ago, ThomasPowers said:

And do you know about draw filing

I'd worry less about draw filing for weight and crossection and more about heat treatment.

Want to make a real sword, take a class from someone who has made them and is willing to teach teens.  Here are students of Theo Nazz (in Brooklyn, of FIF fame).  The students are 15 and 13 years old.

27066847_2096350900380696_7117929124825417807_n.jpg?_nc_cat=0&oh=b34423518e526dd2bd18fa6eabea1910&oe=5BB3BA6C    30724998_2113241088691677_6338116848548798734_n.jpg?_nc_cat=0&oh=d5934577d75410408508b86560484b2a&oe=5B7A919A

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Put a starter finish on first; then heat treat. 

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Posted (edited)

Yea I know it's not much but I have learned a lot and I am still super proud of it. Also I was 12 and have no formal training and all the work was done with a hammer an angle grinder(even the handle) and it is xxxx but I love that xxxx..... but it is xxxx. I am working on another on right now. P.S. no heat treat it is soft but sharp.

Edited by Mod44
language

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Quench hardening took a while to work out especially when you didn't know what makes iron into steel and can't judge what the carbon content of a piece actually is.

(That it was carbon that turns iron into steel was finally figured out in the 1780's; a long time after folks had worked out empirical methods of making and working steel.)

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Cool, post a photo when you can. 

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What alloy was your original sword?  With the style and grip it could even match some early low carbon swords. HOWEVER since medium to high carbon steels are so easy to find cheap nowadays I generally suggest people start using them for blades.

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1. Yes I sure will and 2. It is mild steel, I tried to model it after a gladiolus but it got a little lost

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0000805_gladiola-tampico_300.jpeg      ancient-roman-sword-gladius-fulham-type_    

Gladiolas                                                        Gladius  (Fulham type)

There is a difference...:P

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Definitely keep it, and definitely keep working on getting better. It's good to have a benchmark for how far you've come.

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Fuzzy, you have your first project complete, congratulations. Read and research so you can make your second project better. Each component is a lesson to be learned. Then assemble the lessons into a finished piece. Keep the first one to look back and see how far you have progressed.

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Perhaps his flowery mode of speech is but an "autocorrect artifact"  or perhaps he does want to "slay it with flowers"!

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Turn that chunk of steel on edge, and it’ll work even better. 

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I dunno I tried that but right now I like the big surface. Thanks for the tip though.

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