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Hello all - I am hoping I can get some help identifying my great grandfather's anvil.  He was a blacksmith in the town I grew up in and this anvil sat outside his shop.  Unfortunately I never got the opportunity to talk about it's significance or details of what makes this guy special.  I've talked with a couple of farriers and they say it has a few features they havnt seen, and believe it to be rather special.  Some talking points were it's length, the tool attachment knock outs and the nub hanging off of the from portion.

Can anyone help me out and provide additional information?  Anything would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks

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Made by Peter Wright in England---one of the big manufacturers

It is a Farrier pattern shown by the projection by the cutting step for making clips and the two pritchel holes

The weight: 1 0 12  is stamped in the CWT system and translates to 124 pounds (1x112 + 0x28 + 12)

It was made after about 1910 as that's the date they started stamping England on them due to a US importation law (not a hard date as some items stamped earlier.

What else do you want to know?

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Welcome aboard J, glad to have you. If you'll put your general location in the header you might be surprised how many members may live within visiting distance.

Are you in Alaska? I live a hair north of Wasilla.

Good deal, Thomas and I are online at the same time again. I don't have the book, "Anvils in America" so I could've only offered general information. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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45 minutes ago, ThomasPowers said:

Made by Peter Wright in England---one of the big manufacturers

It is a Farrier pattern shown by the projection by the cutting step for making clips and the two pritchel holes

The weight: 1 0 12  is stamped in the CWT system and translates to 124 pounds (1x112 + 0x28 + 12)

It was made after about 1910 as that's the date they started stamping England on them due to a US importation law (not a hard date as some items stamped earlier.

What else do you want to know?

Well that was a quick response.  Thanks for the info.  I looked up the anvils in America book and it seemed a little steep for a single anvil owner.  That CWT system is interesting and explaining it will be a great converstion topic with the family and friends.  I dont plan on selling it as it's part of the family and I intend on using it for my home projects, but any idea what it's worth? 

44 minutes ago, Irondragon Forge & Clay said:

Welcome to IFI> I always suggest reading this thread to get the best out of the forum.

https://www.iforgeiron.com/topic/53873-read-this-first/

 

Thanks for the info, location updated/added.  I read through the tips and look forward to skimming through all the posts and information out there.  Thanks for your help!

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If you don't plan on selling it, it's priceless!

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Posted (edited)
53 minutes ago, Irondragon Forge & Clay said:

Welcome to IFI> I always suggest reading this thread to get the best out of the forum.

https://www.iforgeiron.com/topic/53873-read-this-first/

 

Thanks for the info, location updated/added.  I read through the tips and look forward to skimming through all the posts and information out there.  Thanks for your help!

13 minutes ago, JHCC said:

If you don't plan on selling it, it's priceless!

JHCC - great response and I definitely appreciate the mentality.  The question is just oit of curiosity.  I'm sure one of the first questions folks will ask is if I know what's it's worth.  If I can't find a approximate dollar value I'll be quoting your response for sure!  Thanks!

Edited by Jdenali02
replied to wrong post

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Face is in good using condition (ANY grinding or welding on it drops it's value steeply!)  CA---US$2-$5 per pound, (Ohio $2-$3). In CA $2  would be a bragging price and $5 more of a desperation price....Higher and lower prices do occur.

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I note you said you were going to use it for projects at home.  Please do not hammer cold steel on the face (top) of the anvil or weld on it.  You will dent the face considerably if you hammer or chisel cold steel on it.  Anvils were made to be used with hot steel.  That may seem like an obvious statement, but we've all seen plenty of anvils ruined by people using them in their garages for misc projects with cold steel.  When people use them in that fashion they are more just a solid base to hit hard things on when it was really made to hit hot steel which is rather "soft" compared to cold steel.  Don't grind it or paint it.  If you must clean it, use a wire attachment to an angle grinder or a wire brush to clean it up, then wash it good with soap & water.  After it dries, coat it with oil or boiled linseed oil.  I use clean 5W-30 motor oil and it works just fine.  The oil will keep it from rusting and make it look much nicer. 

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