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Hi guys 

Please help me I'm new to the craft an am busy looking for a anvil. I found this one but I hope you can help me make my mind up.

Is this anvil to damaged and is that  round a "hardy" or what 

Please give me your thoughts on the anvil.

The guy said that the anvil is round about 200 kg (÷- 440 pound) 

And compared to other anvil of the same weight it's about half the price 

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Did you give it a bounce test with a ball bearing? If it has good rebound I would think it's a good buy, depending on price of course. And at 400#+ that's a lot of mass. Looks like maybe a chunk of the heel is missing, but hey, what do you want to do that that anvil couldn't handle?

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Hello, and welcome to IFI! If you haven't yet, please READ THIS FIRST!!!

It looks like the heel got broken off this anvil and took the original hardy hole with it. Like ausfire says, if the rebound is good, it should still be functional. 

Anvil prices vary widely by region, so if you could tell us what the seller is asking and put your location in your profile settings, we could give you a better idea as to whether that's a decent price. Half the price of the others isn't a good deal if the others are priced at four times the local going rate.

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No I'm driving to see the anvil this weekend. I am still new to the game so I do a bit of scrolling and a bit of knive making.

At this stage I'm busy getting more into it I am using a rail track at the moment. 

Just for fun here is a pic of a vice I just acquired 

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No idea what prices are like in SA, but we have some other members there who (hopefully) will be along to weigh in.

If you do a site search* on the ball bearing test, you'll find what we mean.

*There are tips on how best to do this on the link I posted above.

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Nothing wrong with rail, especially if you stand it on end. If you haven't seen the thread on improvised anvils, definitely check it out.

Is that you in the photo with the vise?

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Were it in the U.S. In my area that would be a good price the way things are going. "If" the rebound is good. Under a U.S. Dollar per pound is rare any more. 

The vise looks good. I have a big beefy one like that. On a vise the main thing that should be good are the screw and screw box. The rest can be more easily made or repaired.  Yours has the leg cut down, which depending how you mount and use it may be fine or have more leg welded or attached back on. The mount and mount bracket are missing but they can be made in many ways. 

 

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Good morning guys 

Spoke to the guy last night he dropped the price to R4000 ( 318.54 usd) so I think I am going to take it.

Would you guys be able to tell me what you would do to the anvil in terms of repair? 

I was thinking to use a flap disc and lightly grind the face an clean up the face and horn and smooth out the tail where the hardy broke off 

15 hours ago, Daswulf said:

Were it in the U.S. In my area that would be a good price the way things are going. "If" the rebound is good. Under a U.S. Dollar per pound is rare any more. 

The vise looks good. I have a big beefy one like that. On a vise the main thing that should be good are the screw and screw box. The rest can be more easily made or repaired.  Yours has the leg cut down, which depending how you mount and use it may be fine or have more leg welded or attached back on. The mount and mount bracket are missing but they can be made in many ways. 

 

Thank you for the advice I have a nice stump and I'm thinking of mounting it to that but I will see if it's to low I will extend the leg 

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I'd wire brush it to remove the surface rust but PLEASE no sanding or grinding on the face or horn! There's plenty of good work in that fine old lady. Stay away from the chipped edge for now, there's plenty of good edge in other places. After you've used it a while the face will shine up nicely and you'll have the skills to make a good judgement about what to do with that chipped edge. It's really not that bad certainly not bad enough to risk welding on or grinding round.

NO welding except as a last resort! The HAZ around a weld will damage the heat treat of the face and possibly take years off her useful life. Welding on an anvil is NOT a trivial thing.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Leave it alone for a couple of years. If you decide to grind it smooth at the end of that time, go for it, you'll be making a decision formed by the experience of working with this anvil and seeing how a ground face will help you, rather than a guess about how it might.

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Why does the broken heel have to be smooth?  What do you plan to make, that can only be made on that spot of the anvil and only if that spot is smooth?

 

So why grind on it?

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Looks fine to me as a usable anvil. Making an old anvil "look nice" takes away from its usable life. The only time I'd say to do anything to an old anvil is if it has sharp or a rough edge is ok to radius it a little. Just go lightly on it. After you use it for a few years you'll know better if you even need to do anything. 

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Looks to me like the heal was torched, maybe to clean up the break or . . . ?

Grinding it smooth is just cosmetics and won't hurt anything but it'll take time you could be using to build your hammer control. She looks like a user to me, rather than decor or an object d'art. She's yours of course, have a good time however you play it. ;)

Frosty The Lucky. 

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I might give some though of welding a piece of structural steel tubing on the heel to use as a hardy hole.  Keep the welding away from the face and no preheat or post heat needed as the body is low carbon (check it with the spark test but not where the torch cutting was done as that throws the test off.).  If it's wrought iron it will be a bit more of a pain to arc weld but quite doable.

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Good idea Thomas, don't know why I didn't think of it. Using your vise to hold bottom tools works fine IF it's set at a good height for hammering. It also lets you make some adjustable bottom tools. 

To get started forging look around and see if there's any hardware in your shop area you need. Have enough shelves? Shelf brackets are good beginning projects, a little decorative forging on the ends, clean square bends, punching screw holes, bend and punch the (hip) brace and matching holes in the bracket. Rivet the hip and bracket, put them on the wall.

This is an excellent practice in production techniques that will stand you in good stead as long as you practice the craft. Make a prototype bracket so you'll know how much stock you'll need for each. Cut all the stock at one time. Forge all the finials at the same time, make all the bends at the same time, punch all the holes at the same time. Once you have all the components finished lay them out and pick the ones that go together best and assemble the brackets.

Make sense? The same production technique serves for making tongs, make both halves at the same time, step for step. It's the easiest way I know to get both halves to match. Yes?

Oh, the most important tip I have for you is. This is FUN, enjoy it!

Frosty The Lucky.

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