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I found a guy selling a 115# mankel in my area but I can't seem to find any info about mankels.
Does anyone know how, and what they're made out of?
Anyone use them? Do you like/dislike them?
I'll be using it primarily for bladesmithing

Thanks
Ryan

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Mr. Mankel is not making anvils anymore. A foundry near him was casting the anvil and then he heat treated and finished them in his shop. I talked to him a few weeks ago. He said some were 4140 and some were 8630, but I could be wrong on that last number. You can still buy them new for around $4/lb U.S.. They are nice working anvils. Do a search on yahoo, I think you have to go to the second page of search results for contact info. Be careful, Mr. Mankel told me that some of the castings were stolen from the foundry before finishing. He is a really nice fellow to visit with. His number is (616)-874-6955.

matt

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I bought one of the older 1970's Mankels, 95# for $100 in perfect condition. Nice looking anvil with a wide horn and wider face then most farrier anvils I have had. Nice ring and rebound from what I can remember of it.

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In order to find out a little more about the Mankel anvils I call Mr. Mankel this evening. He is now 72 years old and still working blacksmithing. This month he produced 1100 dock hooks, and man hole cover hooks. He still makes a few knives from time to time.

He started as a farrier in 1956. In 1967 started making Mankel gas forges. People would see his forges, and asked where they could buy an anvil. In 1969 he started making anvils.

First ones anvils from 1969 to 1973 were ductile iron. They were a 95 pound anvil with a hollow base.

In 1973 they went to 4130 steel and made a 95 pound anvil with a hollow base.

In 1978 they went to 8630 steel with 70 pound, and a 95 pound. They produced a 115 pound that was 1 inch longer overall than the 95 pound anvil and had a filled base, giving it the extra weight.

All the records got burned in a fire in 1987.

They also produced a 130 pound blacksmith anvil made from 8630 steel and a 160 pound horseshoers pattern with clip on.

The 70 pound anvils were best sellers for a while then at the end 130 pound were the best sellers. He quit making anvils in 2005 and the last sales were in 2006.

Only the 130 pound anvils were numbered. Those after 1985 had the year of manufacture stamped on the feet.

He said he used to rebuild old anvils but not the Mouse Hole anvils. He said you never knew if they would fall apart or not when heated. This was from being forge welded with a sledge hammer or being constructed, the horn welded on to the body etc.

He still works in his blacksmith shop using two different anvils, one a Mankel and the other a 117 pound Hay-Budden.

He said he was glad to provide the information. You could tell it brought a smile to his face knowing his anvils were still in use today.

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I had the opportunity to visit Mankel's shop a few years ago and saw his heat treat setup for his anvils. It was very intriguing to say the least. He is a very accomplished man. I wouldn't hesitate to purchase any of his anvils.

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Glenn, that is great information, thank you.

I use one of his anvils. It is very lively and it feels like it does the work of an anvil with 50% more mass. I wish he made a 250lber, that would be a very nice tool to use.

7890.attach

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