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Forging Tapers Video.. 4 Different ways..

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This is a video on how to forge a 4 way taper..  Yes, I know, I know..  " I've seen a million how to forge a taper videos".  

Well, not the way I do them..  :)   Just kidding..  There might be something there to look at..  Please keep in mind..  All of the How To videos are not really about what the final product is..  It's more about the skill set or sets used in making the product.. 

Anyhow,  this ol dog might still have a few tricks up the sleeve.. 

 

 

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Great video, Thank you. Now I have to go to the shop and see which I like best.

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That’s a great video. No elaborate explanation, only what’s needed to describe the process. You made each look exceedingly easy. 

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Nice job Jenifer, great camera angles and lighting. I'll have to give those techniques a try, How heavy is the hammer?

Frosty The Lucky.

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Good video. Using the heel of the hammer was new for me. Thanks!

I was trained with the anvil edge method. It's non-intuitive, because you start at the back of the tapper, and you need to "guess" how deep to forge as you progress toward the tip. But with very little practice this technique can be mastered. And it has a significant advantage of keeping the un-forged stock off the anvil, so heat is preserved.

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Thanks guys..   

 Frosty it's a 4lbs.... ..  I had originally filmed this video  with a 2.5lbs since it seems to be the hammer most used by others.. 

This is gonna sound funny..   But I don't have the hammer stamina I used to ..   I find I run out of steam when I swing the 2.5lbs for heavy drawing on larger sizes   

 

5/8" For me with a 2.5lbs hammer is just a little undersized and it wouldn't move the metal the way I like..   For the 5/8" Sq size the 2.5lbs just couldn't get the squeeze into the metal the way I like to. ( know you know what I mean by this)... I found  with the 5/8" size and 2.5lbs hammer, I was wanting to take a second heat vs being able to finish up the tapers in 1 heat with the 4lbs with time/heat to spare..  

5/8 round or9/16" and down a lighter hammer would serve very well.. . 

If you'd like i will finish the editing using the smaller hammer..  The time frames are just about exactly the same.. I just swing the 2.5lbs faster.. :) 

 

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A most informative video, thank you Jenifer.

I've recently been trying to explain to others why I need to use a larger than would normally be advised hammer, in my case it's how the Fibromyalgia effects me. Using a smaller hammer to carry out heavier work causes me pain and discomfort, however I do tend to go down the sizes as I progress through the process and don't need to be so hard hitting and a little more finese is desired.

There are always exceptions to rules.

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Another great video with a lot to think about. Thank you, Jennifer.

Interesting thought about the weight of the hammer. If the lighter hammer is half the weight of the heavier but you have to swing it four times as much to get the same effect (since it's much harder for a lighter hammer blow to penetrate to the center of the workpiece), then it makes sense that a heavier hammer would actually be easier to use in such a situation.

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Very nicely done; I noticed the center punch mark on the stock for the length to be tapered.

There was one other technique I use to make short tapers on the end of stock where I place the hot end of the stock even with the edge of the anvil and strike half faced blows to "pinch the very end" ====>  between the hammer face and the anvil face---no projecting over the edge by the stock! Raising the cold end to keep the taper forming even top:bottom.  Useful for tentstakes where you want a short "blunt" taper so it will "bounce off rocks and tree roots rather than dig in. 

A teaching opportunity for students is: once they get good at making long taper have them do a 1/2" long taper on the end of 1/2" sq stock. 

Another is showing them that by cutting the stock at an angle instead of straight across can speed up taper forging so if you need a large number of items with a taper on one end; alternate cutting the stick on an angle and straight across (again tentstakes:    ======/======|======/======|======/======    )

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Great video - thank you for posting.  As someone completely new to this I am just absorbing information and this helps!

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Here is the video with the 2.5lbs hammer..     Only 3 methods but you can probably see where I was running out of steam and really needed another heat but called it quits.. 

 

 

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TP. good point (pun intended) as regards the acute taper, it's also a good step in aiding the prevention of a fishmouth forming, a problem so many seem to have especially with larger stock. Cutting the stock at an angle is another good tip (oh! another pun)

Jenifer, that lighter video, same for me with a lighter hammer except I'd not last as long as you do!

 

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1 hour ago, anvil said:

 Nice! I too noticed your centerpunch mark. Lovin' your vids!

THanks.. Means a lot to get the feedback..  Good or bad it's all good.. But good is always better than BAD.. :)      To make things fair each taper was marked at 2" and then forged out..      If I were doing this for a fence or railing the mark wouldn't be as visible if at all.. 

Smoggy,  After the 4th taper with the 2.5lbs I was huffing and puffing and sweating..  I had to take a seat for a few minutes while I catched my breath.. 

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49 minutes ago, Irondragon Forge & Clay said:

After chemo, I have to catch my breath after one taper, but my stamina is returning albeit slowly. I'm thinking of going to a heavier hammer beside my 2.5 lb cross pien.

Just remember to work up to it slowly... It took me a good 6-8months before the 4lbs felt like it was mine again..    

It is funny..   when i started out the 2.5lbs was brutal.. Then I eventually started to work with the 4lbs which was about 4 years after the 2.5lbs felt good.. I had been using the 4lbs for about 2 years and had gone to an industrial blacksmiths shop and he was swinging a 6lbs on a 400lbs Peterwright..   I was thinking "Wow" how in the world can he do that..  

I eventually bought a vintage 6lbs at a flea market and I would switch in in when doing heavy drawing work..  after about 2 years of on and off use.. It become my go to.. I used it daily for about 3 years till I retired..   

I use it once in awhile now but I really tell the difference..  I figure if I keep practicing I should be able to use it again semi-proficiently in another year or 2.. 

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Even during a forging session I will tend to use a lighter hammer warming up and cooling down and the heavier hammer in the middle of the session.  Helps to plan ahead so the heavy cross section changes are aligned with the heavy hammer use!

I've also learned to NOT give college students the choice of too large a hammer for their first class. (and found an old bridge anvil they can use to do heavy striking in later goes anf NOT my small travel anvils (91#-134#)

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That’s one of the best tutorial videos I have seen.  The dual screen perspective and your camera angles show the hammer use very clearly.  And, its all done without excessive chatter and raucous music! Thanks for taking the time to do this.

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Jspool: your welcome..   I like just good old forge time.. :) 

TP, that is a great idea with a warm up hammer and a cool down hammer..   Wise words for any activity at the forge.. 

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Lol,,, laying out a cheap metal building at the moment. Got stuff in the way and 3" roadbase to set cinder blocks in. Doing it the old guy way.

Grabbed 4 shop stands and set 2" tubing on them "anvil high"  and in plane to square my building. 

Now I can tune the gravel and dry set the block and never have to get down in the 3" bloody rocks! And no getting up and down. 

Happy camper,,,

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3 hours ago, anvil said:

Lol,,, laying out a cheap metal building at the moment. Got stuff in the way and 3" roadbase to set cinder blocks in. Doing it the old guy way.

Grabbed 4 shop stands and set 2" tubing on them "anvil high"  and in plane to square my building. 

Now I can tune the gravel and dry set the block and never have to get down in the 3" bloody rocks! And no getting up and down. 

Happy camper,,,

If it works that is the most important part. Glad to hear things are coming along..     I have a tendency to work mainly by myself when doing larger projects..  It is always appreciated when another set of capable hands come along with a few hours to spare.. 

Nice.. 

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