Davishomesteadandforge

Early 1900s or earlier forge

Recommended Posts

The man who owned this forge died in the 1980s he used it before electrucity came to oklahoma in 1937 he inherited it from his father it was the main forge in the dibble/Blanchard Washington region for a long time how long I'm not sure. Any ideas of the origin before that or how to restore it?

20180507_203251.jpg

20180508_082001.jpg

20180508_081928.jpg

20180508_081958.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like a home made forge using a factory made forge pot and tuyere. You could probably get it working again. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The rust isn't too bad I think it would just come off with use the tuyere is unmountable as is so I'm trying to decide if I want to drill out the original bolts or make a track system to mount it. Is the little turny thing inside a air control or a clunker breaker you think?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably a clinker breaker. Little hard to tell in the photo. 

It probably wouldn't be hard to fab up some 2" black pipe into a T to mount to the bottom of the fire pot, or same effort to get the original hooked back up. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't know how JB weld would hold up with the heat. I'd say drill and tap it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Greetings Davis,

        What you have is a Champion Wirlwind fire pot . The clinker beaker is an odd shaped ball arrangement with fingers that stick up through the slots. Not so easy to make.. I have a few but no pictures at this time.

Forge on and make beautiful things

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Jim Coke said:

Greetings Davis,

        What you have is a Champion Wirlwind fire pot . The clinker beaker is an odd shaped ball arrangement with fingers that stick up through the slots. Not so easy to make.. I have a few but no pictures at this time.

Forge on and make beautiful things

Jim

Just looked it up and I think your 100% right

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had good luck torching out steel bolts in cast iron automotive parts, then chasing the slag with a tap. The mas of the cast protects the threads from heat. Note, your mileage may very

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rule of thumb when working with any rusty, stripped, broken, or stubborn bolts or studs, " always start with the least invasive method first." 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have always used acetylene. But as I said, your mileage may very.

Ash, water, heat, time... if those suckers are broken off flush the boy is going to have to get radical, lol.

If your a competent machinist, a file to clean up and flatten the broken bolt and delineate the hole, a perfectly centered punch and drilling out to just under tap size and retap works to. Some how I doubt a screw extractor will work. 

Heating th casting to red may work by converting the rust to scale but who knows.

Das is right, tho. The method with the least likelyhood of destructive failer is a good idea

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You need to be good with a cutting torch to cut out a bolt without damaging the female threads taking a nut off a bolt is good practice but a lot easier. 

Another good method for breaking rusty components loose from each other is warm them up and soak them in water. Water made the rust, it's water soluble water will break the bonds. Warming up the rusted components and I do mean WARM fresh coffee MAX aids in capillary penetration and the expansion contraction of the thermal cycle crushes the rust bond. 

It's the least destructive method I know of, safer than wrenching by far.

Frosty The Lucky.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plain steel bolts, any plating is potentially dangerous. You can remove galvy in a vinegar bath over night. Rinse, neutralize with baking soda, rinse again and it's clean bare steel and safe in the fire. 

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.