Glenn

How do you store your scrap?

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I still have a good supply of new steel that I bought a few month's ago that I've barely made a dent in, so I've been holding off on buying more "pre-used" steel.

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Rthibeau, you raise a good question.....what is scrap? what is stuff?

I think of scrap as 'something left over.....something unusable........but........
If I collect someone else's 'scrap'....it becomes my 'stuff '.

If I have cutoffs or drops that could still be used, then it is both scrap and stuff........sort of 'scruff'!?!

Oh, I,m getting a headache! This sounds like a George Carlin routine!

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This is how I store my scrap. Then I can find what I need when I have a use for it.

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Edited by djhammerd
Update

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With steel prices so crazy, I am down to shopping at the scrap yard less than once a week now. I usualy keep it in whatever container it's in when I buy it. What little scrap I produce, I keep in either old welding rod boxes(the metal ones) or metal buckets if I find them. Saving it up to charge the cupola I am building. My last score from the scrap yard was a rockwell 6x48 metalworking belt grinder for ten bucks, with a 1 horse motor.

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arftist..... I wouldn't mind knowing where THAT scrap yard is. There aren't any within a hundred miles of where I live (that I know of) that will let anyone in for purusing. I need to go to Delaware or Richmond, VA.

Edited by djhammerd

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This is how I store my scrap. Then I can find what I need when I have a use for it.


I REALLY Like that design!!!!! Mind if I steal the design?
thanks,chris

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This is how I store my scrap. Then I can find what I need when I have a use for it.


Just don't tell me you used new steel to build it! :o

Nice design, I especially like the tag along feature.

Mine is kept organized by general type, shape, size and length. The pieces under 12" is in coffee cans and buckets, soon to get rack-like shelving of their own.

Frosty

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Chris:

This isn't really the kind of thing you use a set of plans for. (Unless you're my Father who would've designed it to a half a thou tolerances and made me draw the blueprint)

What you want is a cart with a solid bottom and compartments, taller in the center and shorter on the outside. Building it from found materials is almost a must. (I WAS kidding about using new stock. You know that. )

This is exactly the thing to use that old shopping cart you found along the highway or the baby buggy or the whatever. You have a good imagination this is exactly the time to give it it's head and let it rip.

We aught to have a contest to see who can come up with the most imaginative and useful rem cart.

Frosty

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Selling metal at a scrap yard? I thought it was where you go on Sat mornings to buy steel.

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Chris... Of course, you, or anyone, can copy this idea. I’m glad you like it. The best part of this type of forum is sharing and learning from the experience of others.

This material/scrap cart has turned out to be one of the best ideas I've had for my shop. I push it out of the way back between tools (drill press and milling machine), then pull it out (if I need to) so I can see all the pieces in it, find what I need, then push it back out of the way.

Frosty had it right... I made this (mostly) from scrap (except the wheels). Fortunately, the scrap yard I go to in Delaware frequently has short pieces of heavy square tubing and large pipe. The compartments can be made from anything you have around, or can scrounge. Just be sure the length of the compartments are tall enough so the stock won’t splay out too much (this will only be a problem for a short time, because it will soon not have room to splay).

I welded 1/2 inch round inside the square tubing to make compartments in the square tubing. I welded the compartment pattern a couple inches up from the bottom also. This helps pieces from getting jammed together too much in the bottom.

I cut a slight angle on the bottom of the square tubing so the stock lays back a little (stays neater). Not too much tilt, or the cart will want to tip when it's loaded.

I welded all the compartment pieces (square tubing and 3” pipe) together upright on a flat surface, then cut a piece of 3/4 dense pressboard slightly oversized for the bottom (metal would be better).

I used 4-inch hard-rubber tired (cast iron spokes and roller bearings) wheels from Harbor Freight. I use these wheels (4 and 5 inch) a lot for tool bases. They are rated for around 300 lbs per wheel, and they hold up very well. HF frequently has these wheels on sale for $3 to $5, depending on the style and size. I consider them one of the best values they have. I generally use two stationary and two swivel wheels. It makes it easier to maneuver the tool around where I want it to go.

The handle is heavy square tubing (1.25 inch), that is attached with a single bolt through a heavy bracket. Make this up/down swivel, and HEAVY is important here because I push the handle sideways to turn the cart. When there is a lot of weight in the cart, it takes a fair amount of pressure sideways to turn the cart.

I bolted the compartments to the base so it wouldn't slide (weld if you use a metal base) with a threaded rod through the base (threaded rod is welded to a pipe in the front).

Another useful tool is a little flatbed cart I made (actually this one has an angle iron (up) frame, so it’s a low-sided trailer (flatbed would be better sometimes). I put heavy 6” all metal wheels on this because I frequently use it for moving around heavy projects, motors, etc. Same base and handle idea as the stock cart, just heavier wheels and bed (all metal).

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Edited by djhammerd

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For shorter stock, I have another stationaly storage rack. A friend of mine gave me some short (about 17" long, 8" wide) pieces of metal that came from dis-assembed computer racks. They are, essentially, short pieces of 8" C-channel about 1/8" thick. The flanges are about an inch wide. Very strong metal stock.

I cut slots (cross-ways) in two 7 foot long 2x8s every 6 inches. The ends of the C-channel fit tightly into the slots. After I installed all the metal shelves, I screwed a 2x8 on the top and bottom of the structure to hold it all together.

I then added a bracket (just a piece of angle iron) on two of the shelves (in the back) and screwed those brackets to a stud in the corner of my shop near the shop door.

I put all my short (about 10" or less in length) stock/scrap in this rack. When my shop (garage) door is open, it is very accessable from the side. I keep my long stock in a vertical rack beside this.

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Edited by djhammerd

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My scrap pile(s) have turned out to be the most inflammatory, corrosive, divisive issue in 50 years of our marriage, and getting worse by the day. My advice to anyone starting out: put the scrap far from the house, at the very least totally out of sight, preferably at an altogether separate dedicated location well away from public view. Scrap materiel a few years ago in fact caused a relative to be forced to move out of his neighborhood, so volatile is this subject!! What is money in the bank, handy raw material full of potential to us is just unsightly junk to many others, alas.

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Dj,
Thanks for the pics and the advice!!!! Very nice. I`ll be getting the metal for 2 soon.

Frosty,
yes i know i didn`t have to have more pics but they`ll make design ing and building it much easier.

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Yeah I have to stay orgainized in my shop also cause its so small , also will post pics of my carts when i get em started & done

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I do the same thing that Dodge does. Got rid of the cat years ago (Cats: I love them but I could never eat a whole one) but kept all the litter cans.

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Don't think I don't have heaps and piles too. Just no room for them in my shop.


I figured that much. The cart is the "ready line" of most commonly used stock. Or the stock most likely to be needed for the current project.

Seriously, a person couldn't keep such an excellently stocked rem cart without a large stockpile close by. Probably just out of sight of the missus eh?

Frosty

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I hear that, snow looks great, sounds romantic but in general it's a PITA to live with.

I'm gradually growing my stock pile now most of the dirt work around the new shop is finished. Just last week I picked up about 25 ATV crates. you have to cut them apart but there's lots of good light wall rec and sq tubing.

where in N. Cal are you? My folks used to live on Lake Davis, above Portola.

Frosty

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