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I Forge Iron

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Depends a lot on your skills and equipment: Forge weld and forge, arc weld and forge, cut(hot|cold) and forge.

It also depends on what you want to do with it?  How much weight is it supposed to hold, how portable?

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12 minutes ago, ThomasPowers said:

Depends a lot on your skills and equipment: Forge weld and forge, arc weld and forge, cut(hot|cold) and forge.

It also depends on what you want to do with it?  How much weight is it supposed to hold, how portable?

I need it for climbing steep enbankments 10-15ft tall and for climbing trees without low enough limbs to grab. As for weight and portability, it needs to be able to hold my weight (150lbs) plus my supplies, so around 225 lbs. I would like to be able to strap it to the back of my pack.

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Im with Thomas on this one. Seems spikes would be a better option. 

As for getting from tree to tree at 50 feet up.... I have no idea. Cant think of a way to actually do that safely. Why would you want to do that anyway? Im curious. 

Back to the original topic, however, Thomas' earlier point still holds very true. It depends on your skill and equipment. If i had a mind to make one, i would forge weld several round rods, only half of their length, and bend the unwelded halves to their desired positions. Taper them before welding, if they even need to be tapered. And then test for strength *BEFORE* you absolutely need it to hold your weight. 

38 minutes ago, JHCC said:

Not by itself, but perhaps carried by a swallow. 

It could grip it by the husk!

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11 hours ago, Will W. said:

Im with Thomas on this one. Seems spikes would be a better option. 

As for getting from tree to tree at 50 feet up.... I have no idea. Cant think of a way to actually do that safely. Why would you want to do that anyway? Im curious. 

Back to the original topic, however, Thomas' earlier point still holds very true. It depends on your skill and equipment. If i had a mind to make one, i would forge weld several round rods, only half of their length, and bend the unwelded halves to their desired positions. Taper them before welding, if they even need to be tapered. And then test for strength *BEFORE* you absolutely need it to hold your weight. 

It could grip it by the husk!

As I have now awakened, I shall now answer your questions. getting from tree to tree is mostly because i want to see if i can, and as for your idea, i will most defininetly give it a go.

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I think a few things come to mine here for me.  How much forge welding or stick welding have you done?  Years?  A couple of times?  You'd be trusting your welds to support your weight and the torque of you swinging like Curious George from tree to tree 50 feet up.  I'm not sure I'd trust a weld unless I've had years of experience.  So if you don't have confidence in your welds or welding abilities, then you'd have to find a solid piece of steel you could hot cut out some grappling hooks.  The next thing that comes to mind is steel strength.  I'd be worried about not making the hooks hard enough or making them too hard so that a little torque (like swinging from a tree) might snap a hook sending you on an interesting field trip learning the fun facts about gravity and the softness of the forest floor :o  

I think your question would be like a climber wanting to forge his or her own cams.  Why do that when I'm sure there are grappling hooks / cams made by companies that guarantee their products for so many pounds and for the purpose they are intended for?  

I'm also thinking your scenario through and wondering how you'd get your grappling hook unhooked from the tree you just swung from?  I'm thinking your hook would be pretty dug into that tree if it supported your pounds with gear as you swang from that tree to the other.  

 

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A grapnel will damage limbs too.  Anyway PLEASE be sure you ALWAYS take a buddy when you go try out such things.  If nothing else to give a friend a good laugh; but it may be your life they save.  Never bet on a cell phone still working for a call for help!   Why not shoot a line over a limb and use it to pull up a rope?  Use of grapnels is way more common in books and films than in real life...

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1 hour ago, MC Hammer said:

I think your question would be like a climber wanting to forge his or her own cams. 

Everyone wants to be the next Yvon Chinouard (forgetting that his father was a blacksmith).

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7 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

A grapnel will damage limbs too.  Anyway PLEASE be sure you ALWAYS take a buddy when you go try out such things.  If nothing else to give a friend a good laugh; but it may be your life they save.  Never bet on a cell phone still working for a call for help!   Why not shoot a line over a limb and use it to pull up a rope?  Use of grapnels is way more common in books and films than in real life...

A spinning rod and sinker lets you place lines precisely in trees. 

You really need grapnels if your tree pirate captain orders you to board and loot another tree. Don't you know ANYTHING Thomas? <sheeeeeeesh> :rolleyes:

Frosty The Lucky.

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I use one all the time and teach it's use in Ninjutsu class..  A grappling hook used improperly will get you hurt or killed..  

There is a skill set that goes along with it's use for both hooking it and then retreivel..   

A single pointed hook is the most useful with designs based on type of work used for it..   They actually come in many designs but the single hook style works the best.. 

Quesiton becomes how far you can throw a rope and again it becomes what kind of skill set you have.. 

There is no reason to forge weld a hooks eye as they can be upset and then slit and drifted.. 

 

What size rope did you have in mind?  Also stay away from Sisal or hemp  as these degrade quickly and don't handle abrasion or grit stuck in the fiber well..  They have a tendency to break, yes you read it "Break" when it's the least opportune time..  

 

As with all the stuff I write or post about I have extensive back ground in the use, construction of such devices..  45 years to be exact and have built 50 climbing hooks from 2" up to 8"..  I use one regularly 4 or 5 times a week teaching.. Last week alone we climbed,  tarzan swung, repelled and slack rope walked all using the hook and rope.  

The hook design is based on what or where you will be using it but again,  a person can get hurt or killed without proper training as there is no safety line or safety back up.. No belay device or the like.. 

Before I will offer more info I need your age...  

By the way, the rope will do more damage than a properly designed hook.. Also it depends on the type of tree.. An ash, oak, elm, walnut will do ok..  A birch, or maple will not fair as well with the rope dragging across the bark and will rope burn the tree..  The thicker skinned trees do very well.. 

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