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Incaratus

Struggling to improve

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I have a hard Arkansas Black stone; seldom do I have a blade that requires it.

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Somewhere I  have Dad's Arkansas stones, Shannon sent them to me after he passed away. One is in the top box with his lathe tools and bits.  Excellent stones they were just too big to carry with me in my day bag. 

Right you are Slag, I only use the 1,200 grit ceramic to put a final polish on some blades. A normal stone sharpened blade doesn't work so well on plastics, frighteningly fine edges work better. I bought it when I was doing a lot of Exacto knife work and was appalled at how rough the edges were. A brand new blade shouldn't tear news paper and I was cutting tissue paper weights for silk screening.

Stropping on a buffing wheel makes for a very good edge, better than a leather strop. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Good point Charles, it IS just my opinion. I rarely strop at all so I'm probably illustrating what Dunning and Kruger were talking about.

Frosty The Lucky.

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WOW! A lot of reading but I like scientific test methods. It's better to know than think you do.

Thank you Charles. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Thanks for posting the article link Charles. I'm learning a lot, I'll have to read it a couple times at least and keep it saved. I love looking at pictures with details in fractions of microns. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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10 hours ago, Charles R. Stevens said:

I thaught so, Rockstar.

Incaratus, I like the knife. Couple of minor tweaks and I would love it. 

Thanks, Charles! I'll get back to you after those tweaks!

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Charles,

You posted a terrific reference. Thanks heaps!

Mr. Leonard Lee, the founder of Lee Valley tools, "had" the National Research Council of Canada, (N.R.C.), use a scanning electron microscope to take pictures of steel edges that were sharpened by various stone types and various grits.

For example oil stones, water stones etc. (no diamond, nor ceramic, paper grit  "stones" as it was done in the middle 1970's) 

There were comparison micrographs of blade edges after various grits, etc. Those photos were very revealing and beautiful.

The photographic collection was included in their tool catalogues for several decades. Alas, they disappeared about eight or so years ago.

The company may still have the "originals" or know where they may have published elsewhere. Also the N.R.C. might be able to help.

Again thanks.

SLAG.

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