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Tips for combating moisture in a shop


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I'm having problems with moisture condensating on surfaces in my shop, namely my anvil and (propane) forge.  (I know this is not a good thing for the liner, I take extra cautions to preheat slowly)

I started working out of my detached garage around 3 months ago in the dead of winter and this issue had not occurred to me.  Now that spring is -kind of- here in the Midwest we are seeing rain almost every day.  A powered dehumidifier is not sufficient for the space, and I'd rather not throw more money into my electric bill.  Does anyone else have this issue, and what are your solutions?

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There are several threads on preventing rust on anvils. Personally I don't worry about at all since it clears off when I use them.

For the forge , how about placing a low wattage light bulb inside to keep it warm , or maybe a cover of some sort.

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The anvil doesn't care about a little condensation, won't hurt it a bit. If it bothers you wax or oil it though it'll burn off the face. Fire the propane forge for 5 minutes then shut it off, it'll dry right out.

However, the problem is the propane forge, they generate a huge amount of water as a by product of combustion. About 15 minutes running mine and condensation starts raining down from the roof, even in summer and condenses on everything cooler than ambient.

You'll need to really up your ventilation in the garage and get the wet out while the forge is running and for a while afterwards. Heat exchangers can be set up to act like dehumidifiers. Not great ones but sometimes all you need is a little help.

Then there is putting everything you can that can be hurt by condensation in a sealed container. You can bake sheet rock in the oven at 230f. to make dry packs.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Thanks for the replies, all good advice; especially the part about getting away from the humidity all together!  I know the rust isn't a major hazard to the anvil, but my day job can keep me out of the shop for days at a time and I always feel a little guilty when I see that rust starting to form 

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4 hours ago, Gillinomics said:

Thanks for the replies, all good advice; especially the part about getting away from the humidity all together!  I know the rust isn't a major hazard to the anvil, but my day job can keep me out of the shop for days at a time and I always feel a little guilty when I see that rust starting to form 

Buy a can of LPS 3 and give it a spray when you have to leave it a while. LPS 3 is the rust inhibitor protectorant. The spray vehicle is a very penetrating water displacing solvent containing chemicals that reduce rust into clean iron/steel and has a wax dissolved in it to seal it from the environment.

A can is kind of expensive but a little goes a long way. Once you've coated the anvil it'll stay a long time and you'll only need to touch up the face where HOT steel has burned it off. 

Of course you could just keep an oily rag handy and give her a wipe down when you close shop for the day. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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