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Old (?) tang method

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Hey ive been wanting to learn how to do this type of handle that I really only see on old items and I've recently been asked to make an herb chopper like this

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I can't tell how it would be affixed (especially without modern adhesives) in such a way that it can take stress in any direction without wiggling or coming loose. Anyone who has information regarding this style of attaching a Tang like this perpendicular to the grain would be greatly appreciated and another good skill to learn.

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For the top one: riveting and using a square or rectangular tang and hole.

The Axe may be riveted or it  may have been hot set (burned into a resinous wood at low temps) or held in place with rosin I can't see  it clearly.

  One of the nice things about rosin is that it's easy to remove the piece by heating to a fairly low temp. Also if it does loosen, heat and reset it.  Arrowheads are still often affixed with a temperature sensitive glue. I was once using an irish nail (light throwing spear) I had forged as a stab stick to pick up litter at a living history demo we were doing at a large Irish Festival.  The ground was hard packed clay and gravel  and the head lasted an amazingly long time with just pine rosin holding it on, and when it loosened I just twirled the socket over a candle flame and reset it.  (Note such tools do not do well in modern dishwashers with a heated dry cycle.)

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Many thanks, Thomas, I didn't realize resin was such a pivotal part of a burned in tang, makes sense why traditional Japanese sword handles had a hardwood laminated softwood core.

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Rosin and pitch has been used as an adhesive for thousands of years, predating the neolithic.

Thomas: you might be amused to hear what my results were when I searched "Irish Nail." I got page after page of pics, sites and salons doing Irish fingernail designs. Are your fingernails really long or do you have a secret for bending over without your back aching?

Frosty The Lucky.

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The creepy, scary Dracula movie from the '20s? There was none of the sexual innuendo of the modern vampire movies and stories.

Are the Lederhosen  under the coat?

Frosty The Lucky.

 

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What 20's horror doesn't go with Gilbert and Sullivan, Geology, Hooke's Law,....,and a little bit of smithing?

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Well I finished the herb chopper for my grandfather. The handle is pine with oak on the sides, I also added additional pitch prior to final burning on and wiped the excess. Feels sturdy enough for the kitchen to me. Usually when i hear someone talking about pitch as an adhesive its in a dismissive tone or "you could do that but i'll stick with 5 min epoxy", anyway thanks for the learning experience!20180412_180200.thumb.jpg.e0a459a9e5761e93ba94969cbaf5d510.jpg

 

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Looks nice.

FYI, there’s a food safety question of having a rough surface that could hold onto food particles and serve as nucleation sites for bacterial growth. Washing at a high temperature can help, but that could compromise the pitch in the handle. 

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I'd be more worried about the overlap where the rivets go; but the usage should help with that issue.  Now if he was working meat with it... Anyway it's a beautiful piece!

And yes most people prefer modern methods as they have been developed to deal with modern issues.  There are some people dedicated to trying things out in the "old ways" and for them the old methods developed to deal with the issues of those times are a plus for them. Example:  In cooking most people use stainless steel and aluminium pots and pans and if they want a no stick finish they use a modern one.  However there are folks dedicated to their cast iron pans and ceramic pots. I've even re-tinned copper cookware for a friend.

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A blade's cold shuts and deep pits  can harbor bacterial colonies.

Hot water may not contact those bacterial colonies, or be cooled enough reaching that they not sterilize them. So the little dears will thrive and can produce toxins or infections, (e.g. gastroenteritis, or worse, ((see below))  )

That also applies for water based anti-bacterial solutions. (e.g. chlorine, chloramides, triclosan etc.)

Because of that, most legal jurisdictions prohibit such implements from commercial, hospitals and other establishments. (nursing homes etc.).

An example is useful here for this note. In the early twentieth century, (1910's, 1920's), local small tetanus (lock jaw), epidemics were traced to bacteria (Clostridium tetani) in 'coffee'

cups that had small cracks in them. Those cups cannot be sterilized.

So report a cracked cup to the restaurant personnel. It will be removed and destroyed, and you will get a fresh cup, and thanks. (it saves them a heavy fine).

Your chopper is an excellent job, (SLAG's opinion). But you wish to grind the surface of it smooth, if it is going to be used. (or leave it, if it is to be used, solely, as a period wall hanger).

SLAG.

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On 4/11/2018 at 9:51 PM, ThomasPowers said:

What 20's horror doesn't go with Gilbert and Sullivan, Geology, Hooke's Law,....,and a little bit of smithing?

Point. now I'm thoroughly creaped out I'll go beat something HOT. Oh wait I'd have to clean the shop and it's mud season so the walk is . . . scwooshy.

Frosty The Lucky.

1 hour ago, ThomasPowers said:

How do you sterilize the  herbs  being chopped?

I blanch at the thought! :o

Frosty The Lucky.

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4 minutes ago, Frosty said:

I blanch at the thought!

Should we check your basil body temperature?

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6 minutes ago, JHCC said:

Should we check your basil body temperature?

No thyme for it.

Frosty The Lucky.

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You're really going to pepper us with these aren't you?

Frosty The Lucky.

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In due season. Don't worry: there will be no salty language.

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EGGAD !

 A PUNSTORM ! incoming!

Marg, Rosemary,

"Take Cover!"

SLAG.

 

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