Recommended Posts

I am looking for metallurgical coke in the New England area.  Some googling hasn't turned up much, and I am also not aware of any large smelting or steel refining in this area that I could try to contact.  Short of driving to PA or OH, has anyone ever run across coke in this corner of the country?  I am looking for coke to try as an alternative to soft coal, which is also somewhat difficult to get.  My rationale is that coke will produce less startup smoke and fume, and so would make this hobby easier on those within nose range of the forge, particularly on startup.  Yes, I do start the forge with the leftover coke from last session, and yes, it still smokes profusely for ten minutes or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What did the members of the New England Blacksmiths say when you asked this question? 

Might work better than asking the entire world...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Build a larger base fire before adding the coal. 

The larger base fire will produce more heat and burn the smoke that is produced. Add the coal slowly so it allows the fire to penetrate the new layer of coal and ignite the smoke. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mr. Johnson, the most reliable source of blacksmithing coal in Southern and Central Maine is Aubuchon Hardware. It comes in 50# bags for $12.49.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is all good advice, thank you.  Glenn, I do build a sizable wood kindling fire, and add in only coke from the last fire until I have a good heart, but some days end up with more smoke than I think desirable.  I'm sure as time goes on and I gain experience, I will learn to mitigate the smoke. 

I did ask the folks at NEB, everyone here uses coal, primarily from Aubochon, as noted by Pat.  So far, they are reliable, but I worry, as there is only one locally that carries coal, and aside from them, there isn't anyone else.  Single-point failures always leave me unsettled.

I'm just spending a small amount of time investigating alternatives before they might be needed.  That said, the question still stands; if anyone reading this has ever seen coke being used in the New England region, I'd be happy to know about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When you add the coal, male a small hole (1 inch or so) in the top of the cover to let some of the fire escape. Think volcano. The escaping fire should ignite the smoke and burn it as it is driven off. Works here with bituminous. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.