Jump to content
I Forge Iron

Bladesmith Forge


Recommended Posts

I am torn between buying a forge and building one. I would love to build one but I seem to think I need one now. I have an arc welder, acetylene torch, grinders, etc so I do have the equipment to make my own forge. I was looking at Diamond back but found a Bladesmith that is made by Thermal Art Design in Seattle. It looks ok to me but I was wondering if anyone has had any experience or thoughts on this product. Thanks in advance!

image.png

 The forge carcass and burners are constructed from steel 3 times as thick as the average forges on the market. The refractory materials are of the highest quality and over rated for these forges to ensure a long time of use. Ceramic fiber which lines the entire chamber including under the hearth is rated for 2600 degrees. The hearth is 3200 degree refractory cement which has been cast into a mold on a vibration table to ensure it is super strong and durable. The hearth is then treated in a kiln according to the manufacturer’s specifications to be properly cured. All forges are fired and tested before shipping.

Rather than using a flat hearth (seen on some high end name brand forges to low end low price makes) the forge uses a concave hearth which has been dynamically sized to each model of forge to provide maximum heat retention. The hearth refractory currently used stands up as the most flux corrosion resistant material I have found and the drop in design makes replacing it effortless.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Diamondback has been around a long time; I don't agree with the guy's politics, but his product is sound.

The bladesmith forge, and especially its burners, are built to LOOK nice; not work nice. Enough said?

Also, no commercial forge is completely turn-key as it comes out of its box. You would be well advised to read the Forges 101 thread, whether or not you buy your forge.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the information Mikey. I will check out 101, maybe it will help me decide, if I build, whether to buy a burner or build one. It sounds like a purchased burner may me more efficient, especially for a novice build.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You should b able to make yourself a great and efficient forge for <$200, and have materials left over to boot.  Don't just wing it though, you'll waste money.  Check out forges 101 and Wayne Coe's website.  Best of luck!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a small pressure tank that I was considering using but it is only 11" in diameter and 13" tall overall with the main body being a little less than 10" tall. Seems like it would  be small after finishing the inside? I also have an old oil barrel that is 14" in diameter and 30" tall which could be cut down. Would this be too large to efficiently heat?

Link to post
Share on other sites

One is a little too small and the other is WAY to large. Free used non-refillable Freon and helium cylinders or half mufflers from garages are all great for small forges, while used propane cylinders are the standard large forge all over the world.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I will continue my search for an appreciate cylinder. I live in a VERY rural area and there are not a lot of scavenging opportunities here. That was one reason I was considering a complete forge. I appreciate everyone's advice.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you sir, I don't have a 20 lb tank here to measure, only 30 lb. I doubt the difference in size between the tank I am proposing and a 20 lb would be noticeable. I will email you regarding supplies. Thanks again!

I was curious about the shipping price of a Diamondback forge. After reading the ordering instructions I am positive I will be building my own forge. I felt that company was doing  me a big favor taking my money. No thanks!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I purchased a diamondback forge last year and I am ready to sell it and build my own. Owner's politics aside, it has some shortcomings in the design that make it unsuitable for anything above hobby level usage. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...

I have located a homemade barbecue grill that is constructed from a decent gauge tank mounted on a 3" pipe on a truck rim. It would work for a forge body except the dimensions of the grill are 16"x28". Is there a way to keep the shell intact and decrease the inner dimensions?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought about extra insulation but wondered if there was any cheaper material to use under the 2" of insulation.  If I were to use 4" of insulation that would still be a chamber 8x20. I haven't done the math but that would take a lot of heat to forge.A lot of the work is done for me, base, pedestal etc. but it is huge!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...