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I have a demo, helping with a beginner class and a artisan fair all in the month of April. Since my last craft fair I am taking the advice I received and trying to work on my showmanship. Here is a twist display I will be bringing. I think I will do a hook board as well. Thanks for the great advice from everyone who commented on my craft fair post.

my wife did the fancy handwriting. 

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Very nice. 

If it were me, I would consider cutting the display pieces to the same length to make them more uniform, and possibly stain or oil the wood board to prolong its life. Assuming you want people to pick up the pieces and interact with the display, it won't be long until the raw wood gets dirty without a protective coating, and it make look more finished and deliberate 

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vertical is good. it stands up off the table and gets attention. make sure you do more vertical. A hook board will be good.

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I'm unsure from a few re-reads of your post if the presentation of your pitch is designed to hook in commission clients or lesson pupils.

I think the first question commission clients will ask from seeing a board of demonstration twists is what's the comparative costs -- but a possible lesson pupil will be salivating and sold at the first glimpse of twist No.1

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Love it. My only suggestion would be maybe to upset the very tip of the pieces so they flare out a little at the end. It helps to break up the cut-off look and make them look more like finished pieces. 

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Looks good.

Don't get too wound up about the look of things, rather realize that this is an organic development process that takes a year or three to happen.  You're on the right path, but expect things to change as your skills grow or new materials come to hand.

Big and small, the way you use the space available will make a tremendous difference in how both the students and prospective customers see you.  Keep your apron relatively clean.  Your shirt should be a nice one, not one filled with holes and stains.  No rust should be evident anywhere.  If it something a customer might handle, wipe the piece down and give it a clear coat so the customer doesn't get grime on their fingers.

And watch out for "walk offs".  More than a few times I've looked at racks you've made only to find one hole empty.  Did someone steal it?  Did it fall out along the way?  No telling, really, and it happens all the time!  Best to use some epoxy and fix the things in permanently.  

There are a ton of ways you can go with your display boards, and they'll all work.  Tall and skinny boards are great for catching the eye while also funneling folks in towards you.  Smaller stands like you've made are great for filling up the table and getting people to think about how your work might be used on a project they have in mind.  Keep working at it and you'll have a stellar operation in no time flat.

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Thanks for the great input. These will be for both demonstrations and for gaining interest for buyers. Thanks again and I will post some more pics from the demos and fair

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