Jump to content
I Forge Iron

A7 tool steel


Recommended Posts

What will be the heat treat on the drops; or do you have access to high tech heat treat?

"A7 air-hardening, medium-alloy, cold-work tool steels are high carbon alloys comprising cobalt, chromium, vanadium and molybdenum. A7 tool steels have better wear resistance and low toughness rating." AZO website

So a fancy alloy---over 2% carbon! that is very wear resistant but not very impact resistance.  Would not be my choice for an improvised anvil unless it was tempered way back and heat treat definitely requires ramping furnaces, (tempering temp to get RC 57 is 1000 degF)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No sir, I am not trying to be hard headed. This is what I found on the Hudson tool steel sight, S7 Shock-Resisting Tool Steel is an air or oil hardening tool steel that is characterized by very high impact toughness. 

That is why I asked. If it's not suitable I will move on. Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ive made quite a few axes out of s7, and in my experience, it is quite a tough steel, it dulls faster than some steels, but if HT'd properly, it takes a lot of force to chip it. I was splitting some oak in my shop into kindling with an s7 hatchet i made and i missed my target, absolutely nailed the concrete floor, took a nice little chunk out of the floor but didnt touch the steel.

Take that for what its worth. 

Edited by Will W.
Typo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually it was Laynne that mis identified it: Title of Laynne's Thread: "A7 tool steel:    First  post in this thread, first line: "I have an opportunity to pick up some chunks of A7 tool steel drops"

We answered based on that and it was later that Laynne posted "I misunderstood, it is S7" (and Steve's next post was only a couple of minutes after that one and so he may not have refreshed the thread and seen it before hitting submit.)

And I'd think S7 would be a lovely alloy for an anvil, courtesy of interloy.com: "S7 toolsteel has exceptional impact properties plus the highest hardenability of shock resisting grades of tool steel.It also possesses good softening resistance at high temperatures which gives it hot work capabilities."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A block of 250# (+/-)  S7 is worth many hundreds of dollars, USD.  Perhaps worth even more than the going rate for an equiv. weight London pattern anvil, depending on location. Especially if you have the paperwork to prove it's S7.  

If all you want to do is hammer out approximate knife shapes and then go make love to your grinder, a 250# rectangle of S7 might be the best anvil in the world.  If you want to have a more versitile anvil, I'd sell the S7 and buy a 100# London pattern PLUS a few other nice tools with the extra money from the sale.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...